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Author Topic: Peck-Polymers Andreason BA-4B Build  (Read 7171 times)
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #75 on: November 25, 2018, 11:58:40 AM »

Maybe your watch was slow...?  Cheesy
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abl
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« Reply #76 on: November 25, 2018, 12:40:34 PM »

I'll take that as an admission that you don't want to try for 51+ seconds...  Smiley
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #77 on: November 25, 2018, 03:51:13 PM »

I'll take that as an admission that you don't want to try for 51+ seconds...  Smiley

Rubber strippers at dawn!   Grin
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abl
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« Reply #78 on: November 25, 2018, 04:23:24 PM »

To be honest, I think you might be able to do better with yours - I might be able to squeeze a few more seconds out of mine but the thing weighs about 3/4 oz!
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #79 on: November 25, 2018, 05:26:55 PM »

Probably. Mine is 16.6g plus 3.0g rubber, so a tad lighter. Its all now down to fine-tuning rubber thickness and/or tweaking prop pitch.

I must say its been a great first rubber Peanut to get to know the class!
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Knightflyer
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« Reply #80 on: July 21, 2019, 06:45:19 PM »

I've been reading this old thread with a lot of interest. I've built 2 or possibly 3 BA-4B's from PP kits. I was young then and would start building on a Friday or Saturday night and just crank until I was done.

I don't recall paying much attention to wing washout, etc, yet they flew good. I guess it's a pretty forgiving design.
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FLYACE1946
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« Reply #81 on: July 22, 2019, 12:38:21 PM »

So happy to hear that you still want to build another one. Me Too.
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Knightflyer
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« Reply #82 on: July 23, 2019, 02:14:00 PM »

I downloaded the plan, and was pondering ways to lighten it, without overcomplicating it too much.

Seems like the sheet parts could be made with thinner wood, and a fair amount carved out for weight savings. Maybe use lighter stringers too.

Think I may do one of these next when my Cub is finished.
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abl
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« Reply #83 on: August 01, 2019, 03:36:23 AM »

Mine now weighs about 23.5 grams (most of the extra weight is glue!) after numerous heavy contacts with the walls and ceiling furniture; I used wood that was a bit heavy, but I think you could easily build the fuselage from 1/20" stock.

However, mine has broken the top fuselage stringers just aft of the instrument panel several times - I think the collision shock runs right through the nose until it gets to that weak point, which it then breaks. I would therefore counsel the addition of a (tapered) 1/20" square doubler on the inside of the fuselage running from well forward of the front cabane struts to aft of the rear cockpit opening.

Also, I'd moved the rear peg forward, but not enough - it's only just forward of the stabiliser and it's very difficult to get fingers to, and required a new hole cut in the stooge, which only just fitted. It might therefore be worth considering moving the peg further forwards.

Finally, I notice that it sometimes takes a while to get into the normal circle after take-off, so I'm wondering if the fin/rudder area on the Peck kit is still a tiny bit small.

I want to build another one as well, if only I could find time to fit it in.
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TimWescott
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« Reply #84 on: August 02, 2019, 02:55:06 PM »

Finally, I notice that it sometimes takes a while to get into the normal circle after take-off, so I'm wondering if the fin/rudder area on the Peck kit is still a tiny bit small.

If you can, experiment with increasing the fin area temporarily.  1mm Depron would be perfect for this, if you could find it.  You probably couldn't do anything that would look good enough to keep, but you might get guidance on how to build the next one.

I build a Laird Super Solution flat foamy for RC (it's my one published airplane project).  The vertical fin/rudder area had to be increased by about 50% before it would stop flying sideways (mandatory knife-edge flight is interesting, but not necessarily comforting).  Later on I found a build article by Bob Aberle for a larger one where he talked about needing more fin area -- then I found a flight review of the original by Jimmy Doolittle, where he said that the thing had no lateral stability, and if the pilot wasn't constantly dancing his feet on the rudder pedals then he'd crash!  It made me feel justified in adding area...
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