Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin  |  Contact Global Moderator
July 24, 2019, 04:37:57 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Tatone timer  (Read 379 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 51
Online Online

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,542

Topic starter


Ignore
« on: June 05, 2019, 09:48:28 AM »

Hi. This is my Tatone timer, missing the inlet/outlet pipe. I was going to epoxy some tube in (plenty of scope for cock-up there) but it looks solderable. I'm guessing there is nothing meltable inside the block but in a rare example of common sense, I thought I'd ask first!
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Tatone timer
Logged
glidermaster
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 16
Offline Offline

Canada Canada

Posts: 851




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2019, 02:49:50 PM »

I think you'll find it solders fairly easily Bill.
Just double check the function of the valve before firing up the engine and releasing the model.....

John
Logged

Gliders are a part of me.
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 51
Online Online

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,542

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2019, 03:10:01 PM »

Thanks John. Since posting, I've run it a few times and on several occasions it just stopped, so I've lost confidence a little, in this application at least. But I will solder it up and put it in something less critical!
Bill
Logged
ffkiwi
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 20
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 495



Ignore
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2019, 05:24:42 PM »

At the risk of being pedantic-that's a KSB not a Tatone.....the innards are almost certainly the same Japanese clockwork mechanism-but John Tatone was a jeweller by trade and particularly fussy about checking the clockwork mechanisms used in his timers for reliability before sale...it is by no means certain that KSB were as fussy as he was....

 ChrisM
 'ffkiwi'
Logged
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 51
Online Online

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,542

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2019, 05:34:46 PM »

Chris, you are right of course. I think I did have a Tatone which looked similar. Either way, it doesn't work properly!
Logged
ffkiwi
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 20
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 495



Ignore
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2019, 12:22:21 AM »

Bill they do get a bit sticky and erratic if unused foran extended period-especially if kept in a cool spot (like a garage or outside shed)-the solution is often to bring them into a warm environment and once at RT, wind them and let them run down repeatedly. Often it is simply thickened oil that causes them to malfunction. That does not obviate the need for periodic cleaning and careful relubrication..NOT with CRC 5-56 or WD40 either....

 ChrisM
'ffkiwi'
Logged
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 51
Online Online

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,542

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2019, 02:41:10 AM »

Thanks Chris. What's best to soak in - cellulose thinners?  And clock oil?
It's been stored a very long time.
Bill
Logged
Buster11
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 2
Offline Offline

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 113



Ignore
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2019, 06:00:23 AM »

Though I've never used that type of timer (always preferred a squeeze-off where the timer arm squashes the fuel line) for cleaning I'd soak it in petrol or thinners a few times with the mechanism running, blow it dry with one of those aerosol air bottles, and then carefully put a drop of watch oil on each of the pivots in the face plates, but NOT onto the gears themselves, as that just helps to collect crud.
Logged
duration
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 8
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 455



Ignore
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2019, 06:36:31 AM »

Bill;

Alex Andriukov offers some detailed tips on cleaning and lubricating mechanical timers on his website: www.andriukov.com. Go to "technical info" then "other" then "mechanical timer cleaning". 

I used his method for years before switching over to electronic timers.

While the Tatone timer was a big improvement over the eye dropper I started with in the 1950s, the quality of the mechanism was no where as good as the later Seelig timer or even the K-Mart camera self-timer that was a popular conversion option among Power fliers in the USA. The Autoknips self timer was another popular conversion choice. Note that these timers were external to the camera and were sold as an accessory. High-end cameras (Nikon, Leica, etc) typically had a built-in self timer. You might try a camera repair shop to see if they have any old self-timers.

The mechanical timers used for F1B Wakefield were based on the built-in self timer of the German Contax camera.

I have no idea if anyone is still making mechanical self timers suitable for conversion.

Louis

Logged
billdennis747
Titanium Member
*******

Kudos: 51
Online Online

United Kingdom United Kingdom

Posts: 3,542

Topic starter


Ignore
« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2019, 06:45:00 AM »

Thanks all. Interesting stuff. The application I am using it for is not a fast-climbing duration model that will disappear into the clouds if it goes wrong. It's for scale models that we are now having to fly on smaller sites, so it's back up to looking at how much fuel is in the tank. I usually use the squeeze-off but the appeal of this one is that I can use neoprene tubing that will not split in the middle of a contest like silicon does with diesel. The main problem is that I need 40-50 seconds, not 30, so I solder a bit of...solder... to the waggler to slow it down.
Logged
ffkiwi
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 20
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 495



Ignore
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2019, 07:22:16 PM »

Though I've never used that type of timer (always preferred a squeeze-off where the timer arm squashes the fuel line) for cleaning I'd soak it in petrol or thinners a few times with the mechanism running, blow it dry with one of those aerosol air bottles, and then carefully put a drop of watch oil on each of the pivots in the face plates, but NOT onto the gears themselves, as that just helps to collect crud.

Bill-I can't suggest any improvement over Buster's advice as posted. I generally use lacquer thinners for the 'wash'....its amazing-in the wrong sense of amazing-what you find in the thinners after a good few runs...I wonder how in the hell it gets in there in the first place....!

 ChrisM
 'ffkiwi'
Logged
Red Buzzard
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 4
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 118



Ignore
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2019, 12:01:21 PM »

I have also found a shot of Brakekleen therapeutic. The blast as well as the elimination of any film is helpful. By then it will definitely be oil free and dry. Some lube required.

Bill
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!