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Author Topic: Plastic covering plans  (Read 350 times)
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Smithy64
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« on: August 13, 2019, 03:10:36 PM »

I started building some practice pieces today, and as I’m new to this balsa kit building lark, I followed the instructions to cover the plan with kitchen clingfilm but I found the cyano glue stuck to it in some areas.  I was wondering what others did to protect the balsa from sticking to the plans?  Or do I just put up with it and sand it clean after I remove the loose stuff?

Thanks for any suggestions in advance.

Neil

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TheLurker
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« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2019, 04:14:14 PM »

I'm still stuck in the dark ages. I use a nubbin of old candle end that I rub over the joints on the plan.  I find cling-film an utter pain to get smoothed out properly.

May I also suggest that you don't routinely use cyano?  It has its place in the armoury, but it's a bit unforgiving* and there are other fairly fast drying glues which give you a bit more wriggle room when trying to get a fiddly joint just so.

Lurk

*I believe there are other drawbacks as well, such as weight and brittleness, but I only have that info. as hearsay.  Someone more knowledgeable about adhesives will probably be along in a minute or two to explain properly.
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billdennis747
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« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2019, 04:18:59 PM »

*I believe there are other drawbacks as well, such as weight and brittleness, but I only have that info. as hearsay.  Someone more knowledgeable about adhesives will probably be along in a minute or two to explain properly.
I am an expert on the fact that you will be standing there with an aeroplane stuck to your finger
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Smithy64
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« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2019, 04:28:04 PM »

*I believe there are other drawbacks as well, such as weight and brittleness, but I only have that info. as hearsay.  Someone more knowledgeable about adhesives will probably be along in a minute or two to explain properly.
I am an expert on the fact that you will be standing there with an aeroplane stuck to your finger

I am guilty of that on a previous project, much to my daughters amusement as we chatted on FaceTime and I tried to release it while we chatted.
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2019, 04:33:58 PM »

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I was wondering what others did to protect the balsa from sticking to the plans?

I use baking parchment/grease proof paper from the supermarket. Gives the plan a nice antique look as well through the brown translucent paper

Another vote here for not using Cyno for the structural bits, Aliphatic is my favourite or Super Phatic for small bits.

Bill that conjures up quite an image, are there bits of your finger still on the model? and if so does that form some sort of cheating by including human genetic material
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Smithy64
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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2019, 04:58:02 PM »

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I was wondering what others did to protect the balsa from sticking to the plans?

I use baking parchment/grease proof paper from the supermarket. Gives the plan a nice antique look as well through the brown translucent paper

Another vote here for not using Cyno for the structural bits, Aliphatic is my favourite or Super Phatic for small bits.

Bill that conjures up quite an image, are there bits of your finger still on the model? and if so does that form some sort of cheating by including human genetic material

Thanks another useful bit of information on the grease proof, I will try out all options and see which I prefer.  I nearly bought the Aliphatic glue, regretting I didn’t now!  I will pick some up next visit to the model shop, I’m sure I will find the best solution that works for me with the help of the forum.

Neil
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SP250
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« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2019, 05:13:03 PM »

I still use good old Resin W white wood glue from B&Q for wood to wood joints.
Thinned down with water and apply with a cocktail stick for peanuts or smaller size balsa joints / models.
Or straight out of the bottle for 1/8th sq and upwards.

Easy to get, cheap and it works.

John M
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Smithy64
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« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2019, 05:20:28 PM »

I still use good old Resin W white wood glue from B&Q for wood to wood joints.
Thinned down with water and apply with a cocktail stick for peanuts or smaller size balsa joints / models.
Or straight out of the bottle for 1/8th sq and upwards.

Easy to get, cheap and it works.

John M

That’s good to know I’ve used PVA for many woodwork and craft projects so I’m used to handling that which would be very similar.

Neil
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atesus
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2019, 05:32:18 PM »

I find dry cleaning bags, the kind they bag the shirts in after cleaning, works very well with all kinds of glues. Relatively easy to stretch flat as well. I hope this helps.
--Ates
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Kemper Brown
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2019, 06:05:46 PM »

I use clear cellophane. It’s a bit pricey but well worth it because it is crystal clear and never sticks.
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Smithy64
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« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2019, 06:43:25 PM »

I find dry cleaning bags, the kind they bag the shirts in after cleaning, works very well with all kinds of glues. Relatively easy to stretch flat as well. I hope this helps.
--Ates
Thanks for the tip

Neil
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Smithy64
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« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2019, 06:47:03 PM »

I use clear cellophane. It’s a bit pricey but well worth it because it is crystal clear and never sticks.

That’s interesting, It is pricey but I happen to have loads as I’m a photographer and the prints I sell are put in cello wraps to go out to the sellers, I can give it a try tomorrow .
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Crabby
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« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2019, 09:34:39 PM »

I like wax paper. It comes in a roll, it’s cheap, and it’s translucent.
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2019, 11:18:22 PM »

I have found that the Glad Wrap brand of plastic kitchen wrap works really well. So far none of the adhesives I typically use when building a model (PVA, cellulose based glues, CA, epoxy) stick to that material.

Paul Bradley
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Smithy64
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« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2019, 03:43:47 AM »

I like wax paper. It comes in a roll, it’s cheap, and it’s translucent.

I like the cheap part thanks  Grin
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Smithy64
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« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2019, 03:47:35 AM »

I have found that the Glad Wrap brand of plastic kitchen wrap works really well. So far none of the adhesives I typically use when building a model (PVA, cellulose based glues, CA, epoxy) stick to that material.

Paul Bradley

Unfortunately I don’t think we have that brand in the UK, well I don’t remember seeing it here.  Thanks, I wonder why that is different to the brand I have here that does stick
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Yak 52
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« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2019, 04:08:48 AM »

Parcel tape. Very little will stick to it, including CA. You can get it in white so that you can still see through it and stick it over a section of the plan or down on the desk to make assemblies on the flat. It doesn't come off paper cleanly though and it can be a bit gooey taking it off the desk too.
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Smithy64
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« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2019, 04:58:15 AM »

Parcel tape. Very little will stick to it, including CA. You can get it in white so that you can still see through it and stick it over a section of the plan or down on the desk to make assemblies on the flat. It doesn't come off paper cleanly though and it can be a bit gooey taking it off the desk too.

That may come in useful for some things and easily available thanks
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Smithy64
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« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2019, 02:10:06 PM »

I use clear cellophane. It’s a bit pricey but well worth it because it is crystal clear and never sticks.

I tried some cellophane today worked so much better than clingfilm I still had a bit of sticking but a fraction compared to the clingfilm

Neil
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PaulBrad
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« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2019, 10:03:07 PM »

For your reference, here is the Glad web site: https://www.glad.com/food-storage/plastic-wrap . Perhaps they sell their product in your part of the world under a different name.

Paul Bradley
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Smithy64
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« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2019, 03:49:15 AM »

For your reference, here is the Glad web site: https://www.glad.com/food-storage/plastic-wrap . Perhaps they sell their product in your part of the world under a different name.

Paul Bradley

Thanks I will check it out we do often have things using a different name.

Neil
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« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2019, 03:51:02 AM »

I use Glad Wrap brand "Freezer Wrap" with PVA and Aliphatic. The Freezer Wrap is thicker than Clingfilm or similar and thus easier to lay smoothly over the plan, but not quite as clear. However that has not been a problem.
For spot repairs or any other time when using CA - I use office clear tape to protect the plan/building board.

John
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Smithy64
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« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2019, 06:11:25 PM »

I use Glad Wrap brand "Freezer Wrap" with PVA and Aliphatic. The Freezer Wrap is thicker than Clingfilm or similar and thus easier to lay smoothly over the plan, but not quite as clear. However that has not been a problem.
For spot repairs or any other time when using CA - I use office clear tape to protect the plan/building board.

John

Thanks trying out different options out of curiosity to see which works best.

Neil
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2019, 03:27:02 AM »

First I go to the local library and photocopy the (largest components of the) plan onto A3.  For smaller models (e.g. Peanuts) I just use the copy function on my A4 scanner etc.

I don't then bother with cling-film (other descriptors are available), tape or grease-proof paper.  Like Lurk I just rub candle-wax on all the joint areas before pinning down balsa.

Finally, I use Aliphatic as the main joinery glue.  It dries faster than PVA and is easier to sand.

For speedier drying I have a bottle of Superphatic.  I only use CA (which is heavy!) for those tricky joints which need an immediate bond while, for example I hand-hold components or sub-assemblies in place.  (Like Bill, I then answer the door-bell with half an aeroplane dangling from my left hand!)

For attaching tissue, a glue-stick provides the initial 'stick' to the component's outline.  Once the tissue has been trimmed by an even few mm all round, thinned-down PVA is brushed on and smoothed down with a licked-finger.

I also use thinned PVA for laminating, e.g. wing-tips - why I don't just use thinned Aliphatic for this I don't know....?

Finally, the only thing to use for attaching acetate windscreens or glazing is Canopy Glue - CA will fog the plastic!

Jon
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Smithy64
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« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2019, 08:41:44 AM »

First I go to the local library and photocopy the (largest components of the) plan onto A3.  For smaller models (e.g. Peanuts) I just use the copy function on my A4 scanner etc.

I don't then bother with cling-film (other descriptors are available), tape or grease-proof paper.  Like Lurk I just rub candle-wax on all the joint areas before pinning down balsa.

Finally, I use Aliphatic as the main joinery glue.  It dries faster than PVA and is easier to sand.

For speedier drying I have a bottle of Superphatic.  I only use CA (which is heavy!) for those tricky joints which need an immediate bond while, for example I hand-hold components or sub-assemblies in place.  (Like Bill, I then answer the door-bell with half an aeroplane dangling from my left hand!)

For attaching tissue, a glue-stick provides the initial 'stick' to the component's outline.  Once the tissue has been trimmed by an even few mm all round, thinned-down PVA is brushed on and smoothed down with a licked-finger.

I also use thinned PVA for laminating, e.g. wing-tips - why I don't just use thinned Aliphatic for this I don't know....?

Finally, the only thing to use for attaching acetate windscreens or glazing is Canopy Glue - CA will fog the plastic!

Jon

Got the posts on the glue thread I posted thanks

Neil
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