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Author Topic: Different Glue Uses  (Read 874 times)
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TheLurker
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« Reply #25 on: August 16, 2019, 02:02:40 PM »

Quote from: Smithy64
...what do people class as big?
Ah.  One of those* questions. I think the easiest working definition is a model for which the plan, or any usable subsection thereof,  won't fit on your largest building board and  / or a model that you'd have to move house to store.  Smiley

For me this is anything with a span of more than about 3'.

Lurk.

*Ask n hobbyists (any hobby) a question get n2+1 answers.  All different.
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TimWescott
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« Reply #26 on: August 16, 2019, 03:24:05 PM »

Yeah mainly looking at small models at the moment, what do people class as big?  Thanks for the clarification

Neil

My "big" may be your "small" or visa versa.  When I'm doing rubber power it's usually 16-30 inch wingspan.  The control line stuff I'm competing with is around 60 inch wingspan and four pounds (and it needs to be as light as possible, for all that -- hence my obsession with lots of different glues).  I have done radio control planes from 1/2-A sized (049 engine, 16 ounces & 3' wingspan) up to around three pounds & 50 inch wingspan -- I'm not interested in anything bigger than that with an engine.  RC gliders up to 100 inch wingspans are fun, after that things get tedious.

There are giant scale RC modelers out there who think that a 1/4 scale Piper Cub or Cessna is "little".  I don't hang with those folks: I think they're nuts.
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Smithy64
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« Reply #27 on: August 16, 2019, 03:30:40 PM »

Quote from: Smithy64
...what do people class as big?
Ah.  One of those* questions. I think the easiest working definition is a model for which the plan, or any usable subsection thereof,  won't fit on your largest building board and  / or a model that you'd have to move house to store.  Smiley

For me this is anything with a span of more than about 3'.

Lurk.

*Ask n hobbyists (any hobby) a question get n2+1 answers.  All different.

I thought it might be subjective.  I was thinking 36” or 48” and bigger would seem big, to me at least  Grin
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Smithy64
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« Reply #28 on: August 16, 2019, 03:34:47 PM »

Yeah mainly looking at small models at the moment, what do people class as big?  Thanks for the clarification

Neil

My "big" may be your "small" or visa versa.  When I'm doing rubber power it's usually 16-30 inch wingspan.  The control line stuff I'm competing with is around 60 inch wingspan and four pounds (and it needs to be as light as possible, for all that -- hence my obsession with lots of different glues).  I have done radio control planes from 1/2-A sized (049 engine, 16 ounces & 3' wingspan) up to around three pounds & 50 inch wingspan -- I'm not interested in anything bigger than that with an engine.  RC gliders up to 100 inch wingspans are fun, after that things get tedious.

There are giant scale RC modelers out there who think that a 1/4 scale Piper Cub or Cessna is "little".  I don't hang with those folks: I think they're nuts.

I get it, I’m a photographer, people had the same debates over large format 4”x5” for some 8”x10” others and then the 20”x24” nutters

Neil
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TimWescott
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« Reply #29 on: August 16, 2019, 04:47:15 PM »

I get it, I’m a photographer, people had the same debates over large format 4”x5” for some 8”x10” others and then the 20”x24” nutters

Neil

I don't have enough lives to live.  When I was in my teens my brother had a darkroom semi-permanently set up at my dad's manufacturing company, for catalog pictures.  I made a pinhole camera out of a box and a bubble-gum wrapper and some black paint, and took some nice landscapes using B&W print paper (well, except that the landscape ended up being "Kodak" brand when you contact-printed it).

I've always wanted to do that again, for real, with 4x5 or 8x10, but going as low-tech as possible on the actual camera body, even unto using another box.  Now you've mentioned 20x24 and I'm getting stars in my eyes...
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Smithy64
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« Reply #30 on: August 16, 2019, 05:02:50 PM »

I get it, I’m a photographer, people had the same debates over large format 4”x5” for some 8”x10” others and then the 20”x24” nutters

Neil

I don't have enough lives to live.  When I was in my teens my brother had a darkroom semi-permanently set up at my dad's manufacturing company, for catalog pictures.  I made a pinhole camera out of a box and a bubble-gum wrapper and some black paint, and took some nice landscapes using B&W print paper (well, except that the landscape ended up being "Kodak" brand when you contact-printed it).

I've always wanted to do that again, for real, with 4x5 or 8x10, but going as low-tech as possible on the actual camera body, even unto using another box.  Now you've mentioned 20x24 and I'm getting stars in my eyes...

One of my first projects in college was to make a pinhole camera, they told us to make it out of a shoebox but I hand cut everything and made a few variations including a panoramic one, I still have the shots somewhere.  I went back to the college 20 years later and they still had it and had been using it as an example to the students ever since.

They are great fun, you can buy quite a few commercial versions these days.

Neil
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #31 on: August 16, 2019, 05:12:25 PM »

Quote
One of my first projects in college was to make a pinhole camera, they told us to make it out of a shoebox but I hand cut everything and made a few variations including a panoramic one, I still have the shots somewhere.  I went back to the college 20 years later and they still had it and had been using it as an example to the students ever since.


 That brings back fond memories for me too Neil. I made a pinhole camera as well during my time at college, I can't remember what from though. Opening the lens cap and exposing a shot then racing back to the darkroom to process it one shot at a time sticks in my mind..great fun
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TimWescott
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« Reply #32 on: August 16, 2019, 06:46:20 PM »

They are great fun, you can buy quite a few commercial versions these days.

Eww.  Buy???
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Smithy64
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« Reply #33 on: August 17, 2019, 01:16:36 AM »

They are great fun, you can buy quite a few commercial versions these days.

Eww.  Buy???

I know I would never buy one myself, but you would be surprised how many do and they are very expensive.

Neil
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Smithy64
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« Reply #34 on: August 17, 2019, 01:12:00 PM »

Quote
One of my first projects in college was to make a pinhole camera, they told us to make it out of a shoebox but I hand cut everything and made a few variations including a panoramic one, I still have the shots somewhere.  I went back to the college 20 years later and they still had it and had been using it as an example to the students ever since.


 That brings back fond memories for me too Neil. I made a pinhole camera as well during my time at college, I can't remember what from though. Opening the lens cap and exposing a shot then racing back to the darkroom to process it one shot at a time sticks in my mind..great fun

Magical I showed my kids how to take and process film which from kids brought up in the digital era a bit of an eye opener, we processed a film in coffee which really blew their minds  Grin
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #35 on: August 17, 2019, 01:55:59 PM »

I've never tried Caffenol but I have the recipe somewhere, I kept meaning to try it. I still shoot film when I can because... well its more fun and more of a challenge to get it right so therefore more rewarding  Grin. I think that officially qualifies me as luddite !!  probably explains why I fly mostly free flight models too...  Wink
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #36 on: August 17, 2019, 01:58:08 PM »

Ha, that reminds me of my own pinhole camera:  a cigar-box with a pin-prick in aluminium foil taped over a hole at one end and some 35mm film taped to the back, that way I could process the film and enlarge onto paper... a soft, impressionistic portrait of my older sister!  Worked a treat.

The problem however with photography is that (I thought that) girls thought that was actually quite creative and interesting, whereas aero-modelling was considered nerdy so, aged 15, I made the transition.  Foolish boy!
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Smithy64
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« Reply #37 on: August 17, 2019, 05:26:51 PM »

I've never tried Caffenol but I have the recipe somewhere, I kept meaning to try it. I still shoot film when I can because... well its more fun and more of a challenge to get it right so therefore more rewarding  Grin. I think that officially qualifies me as luddite !!  probably explains why I fly mostly free flight models too...  Wink

I still have a lot of darkroom stuff, not set up yet as we moved and it wasn’t priority one or even priority 10 but I’ll get there eventually

Neil
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Smithy64
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« Reply #38 on: August 17, 2019, 05:29:57 PM »

Ha, that reminds me of my own pinhole camera:  a cigar-box with a pin-prick in aluminium foil taped over a hole at one end and some 35mm film taped to the back, that way I could process the film and enlarge onto paper... a soft, impressionistic portrait of my older sister!  Worked a treat.

The problem however with photography is that (I thought that) girls thought that was actually quite creative and interesting, whereas aero-modelling was considered nerdy so, aged 15, I made the transition.  Foolish boy!

People love to talk about photography but mention model making and they politely leave quite quickly  Grin

Neil
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Smithy64
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« Reply #39 on: August 20, 2019, 01:59:47 PM »

Thanks for all the input to everyone, I used some Vintage Model Company glue today to make the central section to join the wings together on my Hawker Hart, and it was far more enjoyable to use than Cyano and I’d say easier to use too.

Neil
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lincoln
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« Reply #40 on: August 21, 2019, 05:12:08 PM »

I made a "pinhole camera" out of a room, but I didn't try to find 10'X8' film! Also known as a camera obscure.
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Smithy64
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« Reply #41 on: August 21, 2019, 05:25:33 PM »

I made a "pinhole camera" out of a room, but I didn't try to find 10'X8' film! Also known as a camera obscure.

We went to a camera obscura in Aberystwyth as a student some 30 odd years ago

Neil
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TimWescott
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« Reply #42 on: August 21, 2019, 06:46:54 PM »

And, in honor of this thread getting so horribly tangled between glues and photography and extreme DIY:

The old, cheap, depression-era way to make glue for model airplanes was to get your hands on some nitrocellulose film (the kind that would catch fire in movie projectors) and mix it with acetone.  That's more or less what Ambroid and Duco are.

There.  Now all three sub-threads are tied neatly in a bow (as it were).
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OZPAF
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« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2019, 09:07:51 PM »

Well that brings back memories Tim! Years ago apart from film celluloid was also used in toothbrushes - they made a good glue when chopped up and dissolved in acetone! It took about a week. I had a friend who needed more glue and being desperate he dissolved the toothbrush heads - bristles and all - his CL model had some very hairy glued joints!

John
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Smithy64
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« Reply #44 on: August 22, 2019, 03:09:10 AM »

And, in honor of this thread getting so horribly tangled between glues and photography and extreme DIY:

The old, cheap, depression-era way to make glue for model airplanes was to get your hands on some nitrocellulose film (the kind that would catch fire in movie projectors) and mix it with acetone.  That's more or less what Ambroid and Duco are.

There.  Now all three sub-threads are tied neatly in a bow (as it were).

Very well joined together, very apt for a glue thread.  That old film was rather worrying in case of fire, as it burns under water, not sure what that meant for the models?

Neil
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TimWescott
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« Reply #45 on: August 22, 2019, 04:04:16 PM »


Very well joined together, very apt for a glue thread.  That old film was rather worrying in case of fire, as it burns under water, not sure what that meant for the models?

Neil

Given that nitrocellulose dope is basically the same thing, it means that when the model gets tatty you can wind it up, light it on fire, and get a really spectacular last flight out of it.

Can't do that with Titebond and EazyDope!
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Smithy64
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« Reply #46 on: August 22, 2019, 05:30:43 PM »


Very well joined together, very apt for a glue thread.  That old film was rather worrying in case of fire, as it burns under water, not sure what that meant for the models?

Neil

Given that nitrocellulose dope is basically the same thing, it means that when the model gets tatty you can wind it up, light it on fire, and get a really spectacular last flight out of it.

Can't do that with Titebond and EazyDope!

Reminds me of Airfix models we set alight as kids, stuffed with lighter fluid capsules and chucked out of the window when my parents were busy elsewhere  Grin

Neil
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fred
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« Reply #47 on: August 23, 2019, 10:44:19 PM »

Been using ZAP exclusively...since 1976. Then I developed a problematic allergy to the swill.
 IMO they dicked with the Formula..
  as I eventually realised that BSI Ca gave NO symptoms. 
Tried All the White glues.. Found that Titebonds were De facto inferior to simple Stoopid Elmer's carpenter's glue.
 Lotsa advertising Bumph associated with Glues.
 Much of it pure swill. Test and see for your selves.
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Smithy64
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« Reply #48 on: August 24, 2019, 02:32:47 AM »

Been using ZAP exclusively...since 1976. Then I developed a problematic allergy to the swill.
 IMO they dicked with the Formula..
  as I eventually realised that BSI Ca gave NO symptoms. 
Tried All the White glues.. Found that Titebonds were De facto inferior to simple Stoopid Elmer's carpenter's glue.
 Lotsa advertising Bumph associated with Glues.
 Much of it pure swill. Test and see for your selves.

Good advice re’ test for yourself

Neil
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Bargle
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« Reply #49 on: August 24, 2019, 12:05:46 PM »

I use Duco or Sig-Ment for wood to wood joints (I pre-glue with 50/50 glue/acteone on endgrain.) and Cya for wood to metal or metal to metal joints.
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