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Author Topic: Making tissue tubes for indoor  (Read 342 times)
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Big G
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« on: August 25, 2019, 07:12:15 AM »

I've only been flying indoor for a couple years, but slowly and I think surely I am learning how to build better and lighter models, and one by one the various required techniques are falling into place. However, one of the areas I still have some trouble with is the manufacture of tissue tubes. I'm using l/w Jap, wetted slightly, on 1.5mm piano-wire, then rolled around the wire between my fingers with thinned balsa cement. The results are mixed, to say the least. Pushing the finished tube off the wire seems to be the most critical part of the operation. Can anyone give me some practical tips on making tissue tubes? Or even a "how-to-do-it" in however many easy steps?

I'd be very grateful. Thanks.

G
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piecost
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« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2019, 07:47:09 AM »

It is not easy to do so plan to make a number of scrappers for every good one. Mine are made the width of a 6 inch rule and about 3/4 inch long. I think it gave about 3 wraps. I use thinned balsa cement to wet the tissue. The edge should have ample to stick to the mandrell, then roll it up between fingers. Grip the whole length and slide off, immediately,  before it drys. This last bit may be the key. I do not grease the mandrel.
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Big G
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« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2019, 08:59:33 AM »

It is not easy to do so plan to make a number of scrappers for every good one. Mine are made the width of a 6 inch rule and about 3/4 inch long. I think it gave about 3 wraps. I use thinned balsa cement to wet the tissue. The edge should have ample to stick to the mandrell, then roll it up between fingers. Grip the whole length and slide off, immediately,  before it drys. This last bit may be the key. I do not grease the mandrel.

Thanks for this! I think you've hit it - I was waiting too long before I tried removing the tubes from the mandrel. I just tried your suggestion, and success!

Thanks again,

G
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151-30
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« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2019, 01:41:14 PM »

Just try this:
at your fishing shop buy thin silicone tube 0.5, 0.8 or 1 mm ID or more.
Then cut 5 cm and slide correspondant dia piano wire.
Roll jap tissue with thinned cellulose cément with two fingers on flat surface till unstcky.

Let dry 1 jour, remote piano wire and then silicone tube that shrink when pulling.The papier tube won't stick.
You can obtain  1mm, 1.2 mm 1.5 mm internal dia papier tube....or more.
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jswain
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« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2019, 05:17:55 PM »

i use a common wood toothpic, stick most of the toothpic into one of those foul smelling scented candles my wife likes to buy, making sure toothpick is thoroughly coated in the candle wax (wax tends to be really soft like room temperature butter), using my fingernail to hold long end edge of 3/4" wide x 1 .25"  long tissue rectangle to waxed toothpick and begin to roll as tightly the pre-wetted with slow CA or wood glue tissue ( use as little glue as needed, much glue will be pushed along length of tissue and out as you roll ). when you have glued last of tissue edge the tube it will 66% of the time slide easily off  toothpick due to slick candle wax. I like the slow set CA but wood glue is fine, just need to wait longer for full drying and rigidity.

**The key is the wax otherwise the tube likes to stay on toothpic**.

 Repeat waxing for next roll otherwise tube will probably glue itself to toothpick. I wait awhile and let glue thoroughly dry and later coat ends of tube to make stronger. A sharp razor blade or scissors can cut tube to length- use toothpick to restore crunched ends shape from cutting.

good luck! john s

ps - convenience stores like 7/11 have little red plastic coffee stirring straws that are right size diameter too if you just want to snip off a bit of that to get it over with asap Wink
« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 05:31:04 PM by jswain » Logged
Olbill
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« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2019, 05:57:22 PM »

My method (borrowed from Don Slusarczyk):

1. Coat a strip of tissue with thinned Duco or Ambroid and let dry for a minute or two. Cut into pieces around an inch long. Have two mandrels on hand (mine are 1/16" drills).

2. Make two flags. Put a small amount of glue on the edge of the tissue and stick the tissue to the mandrel with a little bit hanging off the end.

3. When the flags are dry take one of them and put a glob of glue on the tissue next to the mandrel. Try not to put the glue all the way against the mandrel. I try to use enough glue here to glue the whole strip with enough glue left over to coat the outside of the tubes.

4. Roll the tissue onto the mandrel with your fingers.

5. Make a small cut with a razor blade at the end of the mandrel. This is to allow air into the tube when you pull it off. Otherwise it will probably collapse.

6. Grab the end of the tube with your fingernails and pull it off.

7. Make a new flag with the mandrel you just used and set it aside to dry. Roll the next tube starting with the second flag from the first step. This way you can do tubes continuously until you have enough made.

If you use some sort of tubing for your mandrels then you don't have to worry about making the air holes.

See the next post for a photo of the finished tubes.
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Olbill
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« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2019, 05:58:09 PM »

Finished tubes.
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Big G
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« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2019, 05:54:05 AM »

Thank you for all your replies, and your assistance, gentlemen. I made some tubes earlier, basically following Piecost's method of removing the tubes as soon as they're rolled. Have now made more than enough for my current build, plus a few spares. I do realise that making tissue tubes is one of those operations in which individual aeromodellers have their own favourite, and different, methods, that all seem to work - a lot of my flying friends can't get their heads round my method of building models on glass! Works for me, that's the main thing!

Thanks and merci,

G
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rodders67
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« Reply #8 on: August 26, 2019, 09:27:45 AM »

Hi Big G
I make tubes in a similar manner to Piecost.  However I rub the stock of a twist drill  with a candle and then polish it with a cloth before rolling a tube.
The tubes come off with ease then.
Regards
Rodney
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Larry R.
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« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2019, 10:26:14 PM »

Please forgive my ignorance...I haven't a decent place to fly indoor models....but, what are the tissue tubes for?
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Indoorflyer
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« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2019, 01:01:03 AM »

A typical application is a wing mount.  The paper tubes serve as "sockets" on the fuselage that receive the wing posts. Here is a snip from an A-6 plan showing the 2 tubes attached to the fuse/motorstick.  Wing removal allows easier transport in a smaller box. 
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Make the same mistake on both sides; nobody will notice...
Larry R.
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« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2019, 09:05:46 AM »

A typical application is a wing mount.  The paper tubes serve as "sockets" on the fuselage that receive the wing posts. Here is a snip from an A-6 plan showing the 2 tubes attached to the fuse/motorstick.  Wing removal allows easier transport in a smaller box. 

Thanks.  I always enjoy learning new things.
Larry
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Larry R.
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« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2019, 09:06:08 AM »

A typical application is a wing mount.  The paper tubes serve as "sockets" on the fuselage that receive the wing posts. Here is a snip from an A-6 plan showing the 2 tubes attached to the fuse/motorstick.  Wing removal allows easier transport in a smaller box. 

Thanks.  I always enjoy learning new things.
Larry
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