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Author Topic: Why do some folks prefer white glue over yellow?  (Read 531 times)
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stovebolt
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« on: November 25, 2019, 11:30:30 PM »

I got some white today, but they were out of wood workers glue.
it's cheaper but still over night dry time. Why do some prefer it?
thanks Pat
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p40qmilj
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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2019, 09:54:31 AM »

 Grin what's the rush? Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin Grin
jim Grin
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Mark Braunlich
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« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2019, 12:02:51 PM »

I use both, usually whichever is closest reach.  The white is supposedly NOT waterproof but you'd have to submerge your glue joint in water for some considerable amount of time for the joint to soften.  You don't have to worry about rain disassembling your model.
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DavidJP
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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2019, 01:13:53 PM »

I have some glue that is white in colour that is waterproof that I use for non modelling jobs, but honestly I don't think a waterproof glue is necessary - but being so may have some bearing on the drying time.  You see I tend to favour presently Titebond translucent wood glue which is white and has quite a quick "grab" time with balsa particularly and so holding a joint in your fingers if need be for no more than a couple of minutes or so can be sufficient - they say on the bottle 24 hours for a full setting which I suppose is no real problem.

I also like to thin my glue occasionally with water and Titlebond is OK. I am not sure if the waterproof glues will accept being thinned with water?

Balsa tends to absorb water well  so submerging the joint may well mess it up regardless of the performance of the glue. 

AND I don't like the look of yellow glue anyway.  Bleah!   
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mick66
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2019, 01:39:42 PM »

Hi

In my experience yellow 'aliphatic' type wood glues tend to dry harder and sand better than white.

Cheers

Mike
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duration
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2019, 01:53:56 PM »

I agree about aliphatic glues such as Tite Bond. Years ago I built a F1H towline glider wing using white glue. I stored in a box in the shed I was using as a workshop. It rained, the roof leaked, and I found the pieces from the completely disassembled wing floating in the water.

I've used Tite Bond ever since. Both Lowes and Home Depot carry it. The pint bottles are only slightly more expensive than the small size.

Louis
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OZPAF
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2019, 06:34:04 PM »

As already mentioned it takes a lot of water to dissolve or weaken a white glue joint, but this actually can be used to advantage. Even with  the more expensive cross linked white glues - painting the joint with liberal quantities of water enables the joint to be broken where a correction needs to be made. I'm not sure if you can do this with Aliphatic - or yellow PVA.

John
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lincoln
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2019, 02:10:39 AM »

White glue is fine. Haven't done any test pieces to see which sands easier. I understand that some kinds of white glue are more vulnerable to water than others. I think so-called "school glue" is even supposed to be washable. There's another kind that can stand up to multiple trips through a washing,machine! I seem to recall that crafty stores have a bewildering variety of white glue. I don't know which are actually different.
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OZPAF
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« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2019, 04:23:20 AM »

The type I'm using now is an exterior grade and claims to be a "cross linked PVA", thicker than some of the craft glues sold here which seem to be watery to me.
As for drying time - if it is a tight joint and it is rubbed or clamped - it will take and hold fairly quickly.

John
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C/L Gee Bee
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2019, 03:59:08 PM »

Owner of our hobby shop in 1970 did a comparison, (Elmer's white vs. yellow Tite-Bond) and we were impressed. Used Tite-Bond ever since in large C/L, Old timer R/C assist and now outdoor rubber free flite.
Behaves well with water dilution, never a problem. (could dry a little faster! Don't know why I'm in such a hurry, though...)
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scigs30
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« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2019, 11:06:14 AM »

Personally, I just don't like that yellow glue leaves discoloration to the build when dry or my furniture.  I like the look of a clean build with no glue lines.  With that being said, remember white and yellow glues are PVA.  The yellow color is just for marketing, Titebond has even said this. Titebond I is a modified PVA glue and is called Aliphatic.  Titebond II is a PVA glue that resists water and is not a Aliphatic wood glue.  I used Elmers Glue-all for years with no issues but I did not like it as much since they changed the formula a few years back.  Titebond makes a wood good that is translucent when dried and works pretty good but it is not an aliphatic.  In my restoration of furniture I use white glues over yellow and recently have been using Roo Glue.  Roo Glue is an Aliphatic resin and you can buy it in white or yellow.  They also sell a Type II PVA glue and once again you can order it in white or yellow.  I get the white Aliphatic glue and it works great, fast tack time and sands easy, reminds me of Titebond original. 
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flydean1
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« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2019, 03:02:38 PM »

Hoo sells Roo Glue?
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Greg Langelius
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« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2020, 10:57:10 AM »

Was informed some years back that aliphatic resin and ammonia are not compatible; so using the ammonia to bend, and the aliphatic to laminate needs to be done in two separate stages.

This may not be accurate, but I'm putting it out there as a potential warning.

Greg
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New knowledge is found by re-examining old assumptions.
billdennis747
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« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2020, 12:01:40 PM »

Yes - that's true
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stovebolt
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« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2020, 02:25:23 PM »

I used Elmers Glue-all for years with no issues but I did not like it as much since they changed the formula a few years back. 
  I used the white Elemers to tack on tail feathers, thinking it would be easier to loosen and adjust, than Woodworkers glue.
The first test flight spiraled in and popped them off. I was surprised to see the wood broken away. It was a good glue joint, not like the old Elmers of the 70’s.
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