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Author Topic: Scientific 1/2A Aeronca Sedan  (Read 609 times)
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Mark Braunlich
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« on: January 03, 2020, 03:23:25 PM »

Growing up in the '60s, this book by Walter Musciano was a constant source of inspiration and dreams.  My brother and I never had the money for an engine back then but the book, in our school's library, was often in our hands.  I learned the rudiments of drafting by enlarging the plan for the Northrop Gamma in Chapter 5.  This little Aeronca Sedan was the subject of Chapter 2.  This one is scratch built, the old Scientific kits being prohibitively expensive if you can find them.  My brother built it, I painted it.  It will soon get an OK Cub engine.  It's purely authentic 1950s-60s build.
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Mark
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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2020, 04:31:51 PM »

Mark,
   Outstanding workmanship!  I too, have Walt,s book in my library. Very nice vintage
stuff in there. I had the honor of exchanging snail mail with him some years back when
I asked for permission to reproduce some of his designs. What a man he was. I learned
from some close friends of his that he passed away on April 3, 2019.

Skyraider
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TimWescott
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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2020, 06:52:58 PM »

I have that book on my shelf.

If you haven't, read his bio -- he was orphaned in the 1930's, and ran away from his aunt's family when they wouldn't let him build models.  He owned a suitcase with a few cloths and a complete model shop, which let him build model airplanes as a homeless child.

Which, you have to admit, is true dedication to the sport.
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charlieman
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« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2020, 02:10:31 PM »

Mark,
What lovely model and some great memories of books and airplanes!
I too checked -out Walts book as a kid. I couldn't afford many kits, in late 50's, but could build Scientific designs from Walt's original plans. I learned to fly CL with  his "Saber". I also dreamed over his near monthly WWII fighter designs, in American Modeler. P-51B and Kawasake Tony, being my favorites.

I got to know an Aeronca Sedan quite well as a youngster, too. Had to push one out of the way (and put it back, EVERYTIME) to get my Pop's Stitts Playboy, from the back of a shared hanger, at Ried's Hilview Airport, San Jose Calif. Owner was OLD friend of t e family, Harold Boshardt, so ,kh yeah, I also got  ,several rides in it 1958-1966, or so, but it was the moving I remember most. IIRC, the aircraft is now on display at the air museum at South county Airport, near Morgan Hill, Cailf. Years later I witnessed, from only about 8 ft away, a near tragic prop starting incident, when an over confidant starter touched an apparently "hot" propeller and engine. The blade barely moved under weight of one hand, as he leaned around the left blade to speak to the pilot. The prop was instantly spinning!!  at better than half throttle! the startled crewman just stood there, absolutely  dumbfounded. I really thought he was going to waver and tumble forward. His blank face was only INCHES  away from the spinning blades. Finally, he snapped out of it and shakily backed away. Fortunately, the pilot apparently had applied brakes and aircraft hadn't hadn't lurched forward. It happened so fast and I still shudder to think about it.

I've been retired, now, for about 10yrs. And it just occurred to me that the very last ride got was about 10 years ago in a Sedan! It was the only time I ever got fly one. PIC was Ty Sunstrom , from the Spirit project).
Good on you.
charlie
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Indoorflyer
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« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2020, 02:23:33 PM »

I have that book on my shelf.

If you haven't, read his bio -- he was orphaned in the 1930's, and ran away from his aunt's family when they wouldn't let him build models.  He owned a suitcase with a few cloths and a complete model shop, which let him build model airplanes as a homeless child.

Which, you have to admit, is true dedication to the sport.

My goodness.  What a background.  Here's a link for more reading:

https://www.modelaircraft.org/sites/default/files/files/MuscianoWalterAWalt.pdf
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ghostler
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2020, 10:30:08 AM »

I have that book on my shelf. If you haven't, read his bio -- he was orphaned in the 1930's, and ran away from his aunt's family when they wouldn't let him build models.  He owned a suitcase with a few cloths and a complete model shop, which let him build model airplanes as a homeless child. Which, you have to admit, is true dedication to the sport.
My goodness.  What a background.  Here's a link for more reading: https://www.modelaircraft.org/sites/default/files/files/MuscianoWalterAWalt.pdf

Thanks for the link, I downloaded Walt's pdf biography and read it. He was an amazing character and speaks of how the government of Finland has a great number of craftsmen and designers because of government sponsored model building. I wished our government was interested in how to improve our people. Seems student bank loans have replaced subsidized education.

He is right, much of his models could be built on a desk or kitchen table top. In high school back in the late 1960's, I built my models on my bedroom floor or desktop, ditto in college. I also have one of his books, I bought it as new old stock from an on-line bookstore 20 years ago. It has the Aeronca Sedan hollow log design and article. Also has his interesting .020 Pee Wee 12" span built up fuselage Fokker Dr1 Triplane.

He passed away April last year. I heard in Cox Engine Forum that he the last few years was in a nursing home. Before that, a few mentioned that by writing him, one could buy at a reasonable price the Scientific kit plans.

I'd like to double up the size of his 1964 18" span Grumman F6F Hellcat built up wing and fuselage and install my Testor McCoy .19 Red Head in it. That was my first CL kit plane in 1965 as an 11 YO.
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George Hostler
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« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2020, 01:15:11 PM »

Now with struts and hardwood wheels. Still trying to unstick the old OK Cub .075. Also still looking for my one remainiin Scientific hardwood tail wheel. Need to cut out mask for the tail registration numerals which will be sprayed on. I don’t know about the aluminum cowl. It’s already nose heavy.Did any of you out there make those cowls for the Scientific kits?
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TimWescott
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2020, 05:02:54 PM »

... Still trying to unstick the old OK Cub .075. ...

Start a thread on that one!  You've dribbled fresh fuel on it, and when that didn't work, warmed it with a heat gun or oven?
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ghostler
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« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2020, 05:06:17 PM »

For a number of Walt's kits, he simply used sheet aluminum bent in the approximation to mimic original engine cowl. My Cessna 180 and Messershmidt ME-109 hollow log sheet wing were this way (except in plastic sheet).

Something lightweight like current aluminum soda cans would be reasonably lightweight and easy to cut with shears. He used shortened dress maker pins, like the ones new clothing is shipped with to hold its form in the packaging. push these pin heads spaced about a quarter inch apart around the peripheral of the ply firewall edge. One could simply take card stock like a used file folder, careful fit and trim to get the correct shape to cut out of aluminum.

Later in the 1960's, Scientific replaced these with plastic sheet card stock die cut to shape, no doubt to reduce kit cost. You can check with David Cowell (I think that is his name, been a while) at Aerowerkes kit manufacturing out of Farmington, New Mexico. I don't know if he still does these but for a time he was laser kitting a number of Walt's kits. With these where Scienfic did, he vacuum formed replica cowls. I guess he also supplied sheet plastic cowls where kit specified. There is another who of more recent has been doing Musciano laser cut half-A CL kits, but the name escapes me.

BTW, really nice job on the Aeronca, will be a head turner when completed.
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George Hostler
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« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2020, 09:35:20 PM »

Tim, I didn’t know about heating the engine. I tried dripping fresh fuel but that was a failure. Yes I do remember the flat plastic cowl parts in the original Scientific kits. I built the models and never bothered with those cowls. I’d just go fly them as soon as the dope was dry and haul the busted model home and patch it up. I never seemed to glue in the landing gear wire properly so that broke out almost every landing. Later on I learned about epoxy. Wonderful stuff. The Piper Cruiser was my favorite. Also built a Scientific Curtiss SB2C Helldiver in prewar colors but the wing warped from dope into a reverse airfoil so I just trashed the model before it was finished. Strange what I did as a kid. Could have easily been fixed.
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Bingo Fuel
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« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2020, 09:39:52 PM »

I would love to do the F-82 Twin Mustang that was also in the Musiano book. Oh the hours spent looking at that chapter. I’ll have to find two canopies from Cox P-51d models.
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RolandD6
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« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2020, 10:52:48 PM »

A good way of freeing up an oil frozen engine is to heat it for a day or so in hot automatic transmission fluid. Unlike castor oil, the fluid does not polymerise so the engine will remain free and protected from corrosion.

An old crock pot or similar slow cooker works well. I had one and treated my engine collection. My son-in-law now has it and is busy building a collection of old engines.

Hope that helps

Paul

Oops. I originally said automobile instead of automatic. It must be automatic transmission fluid. The oil in manual transmissions is unlikely to work properly.
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Bingo Fuel
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« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2020, 08:51:51 AM »

Paul, thanks for that information. I will give it a try. I know I have some automatic transmission fluid in the garage. I’ll let you know how it works.
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