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Author Topic: What Carbon Fiber tape or sheet?  (Read 295 times)
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PantherM100
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« on: August 19, 2020, 05:10:19 PM »

Hi Guys:
I will be building P30, I have noticed some people using
Carbon fiber strip for wing capstrips.  Can someone please
Give me source & dimensions?  What’s the best way to strip this
Material?  Also, on one YouTube video the builder said he was
Using “Gleam Tooth Paste”!  Something to do with applying C/A
For glueing the capstrips to wing and stab ribs.
Sincerely,
Jon B. Shereshaw
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Bredehoft
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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2020, 05:23:27 PM »

Someone might recommend thinner, but here are some 0.005" thick strips, in various widths:

http://www.cstsales.com/Carbon_Fiber_Strips.html

I sell this same stuff on my site, too.

--george
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lincoln
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2020, 02:30:31 AM »

I'm wondering if the toothpaste is for putting a very fine texture on the carbon so it glues better. If so, it probably needs a good rinse after.

I suspect that .005" is overkill and that a uni laminate would work just as well as a pultruded strip. With the uni laminate, the question isn't so much how to strip it as how NOT to strip it. Handle carefully so it doesn't split into random width strips. You can start a split where you want it with a knife.

I've heard of thinner material, but I think it tends to be a specialty item.
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piecost
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2020, 04:57:57 AM »

I have experimented with small sizes of carbon. I think that 0.005" precured is about the thinnest available. I also have some 100g/m2 unidirectional cloth which when wetted out makes the same thickess and mass material. I guess that this might be glued ontop a balsa spar. It does.not feel like too much carbon for a P30. Perhaps a couple of laminations near the root might work.
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piecost
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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2020, 03:50:33 PM »

Another thought. Have a look under the high tech materials section of the freeflightsupplies website. This includes ready cut.spar caps. It will give you an idea of the sizes used.
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calgoddard
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2020, 08:06:43 PM »

I can save you some time.  The plan for Don DeLoach's Polecat MK X P-30 indicates that the wing ribs are optionally capped with .005 x 1/16 inch "carbon" strips, and the stab ribs are also optionally capped with the same size strips. A full-size plan is available from Don DeLoach.  He also sells a laser-cut rib set for this model

Don has won many, many contests with this P-30 and is basically unbeatable by anyone, except for a very few fliers that might be able to beat him from time to time, like Stan Buddenbohm.

The Polecat MK X P-30 is a 40.5 gram model - counting the 3 gram weight of the onboard RF tracker! My guess is that Don indicates a weight budget of 40.5 grams to ensure that the model is not underweight due to variations in humidity.

The wing has a D-box construction which is challenging. It is flown with a 6 x 3/32 rubber motor because it is at minimum weight.  The model uses a .047-inch diameter prop shaft and a Peanut size Crocket hook to save weight.

If you want to build a P-30 that weighs 40 grams or less, you should follow a weight budget for your selected model.  Remember that if the model is too light, it may lack the strength to survive the rigors of free flight, and/or may be prone to troublesome warping.

If you are building your first P-30 and are dead set on hitting the 40 gram target, and you have a good set of building skills, do yourself a favor and purchase a P-30 kit from CB Model Designs.  The quality of these Clint Brooks kits is top notch and the his P-30 models can be built to minimum weight using the contents of the kits due to Clint's designs and his careful balsa wood selection.  You don't need carbon fiber composite parts to build a strong P-30 that weighs 40 grams.

A P-30 that weighs 45 grams can win almost any P-30 contest. It just takes good trimming, good winding, and good picking of air. Don, Stan and Clint could probably swap their 40 gram P-30s for another flier's 45 gram P-30 and consistently beat them flying the heavier model, after a few trim flights and possibly a couple of trim adjustments.

You shouldn't try flying a 45 gram P-30 with a 6 x 3/32-inch rubber motor. It wont get very high and may land with a fair amount of unused turns on the rubber motor.  You must fly a 45 gram P-30 with a conventional 6 x 1/8-inch rubber motor.  Properly trimmed it will climb steeply when launched at 85% or more of the motor's breaking torque.

Enjoy building and flying whatever P-30 model you choose.


« Last Edit: August 22, 2020, 09:23:44 PM by calgoddard » Logged
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