Logo
Builders' Plan Gallery  |  Hip Pocket Web Site  |  Contact Forum Admin (Account/Technical Issues)  |  Contact Global Moderator
September 26, 2021, 01:49:27 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with email, password and session length
 
Home Help Search Login Register
Pages: [1]   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: What are you using as a mandrel  (Read 369 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
PantherM100
Bronze Member
***

Kudos: 0
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 70

Topic starter


Ignore
« on: October 09, 2020, 11:05:02 PM »

Hi Guys:
What are you using for a mandrel for
Rolled balsa P30 fuselage tubes?  And
How about tapered section P30 tubes?
Sincerely,
Jon B. Shereshaw
Logged
NormF
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 13
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 571




Ignore
« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2020, 01:27:44 AM »

I use a piece of copper water pipe for the entire tube, ala Stan B.

NormF
Logged
ffkiwi
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 24
Offline Offline

New Zealand New Zealand

Posts: 614



Ignore
« Reply #2 on: October 10, 2020, 02:17:34 AM »

I use aluminium or plastic tubing of appropriate diameter if rolling a parallel section tube; if a tapered tube I use a pool cue as a mandrel.  for large tubes such as Mulvihill or Unlimited tapered tailbooms I have a tapered wooden former machined up on the lathe; you can buy similar items on Ebay in the jewellers' tools area-they're used for making bracelets on...

 ChrisM
 'ffkiwi'
Logged
hastf1b
Gold Member
*****

Kudos: 14
Offline Offline

Germany Germany

Posts: 390


Winding my Tilka during the german chamionship `87



Ignore
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2020, 03:26:13 AM »

I use for the Motor tube, in german "Leuchstoffröhre/Neonröhre" and for the tailbom I use a pool cue.


Heinz.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2020, 03:46:18 AM by hastf1b » Logged

F1B is o.k.
randoloid
Silver Member
****

Kudos: 9
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 153



Ignore
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2020, 12:41:58 PM »

I've tried lots of things including hardwood dowels - which never remain true and become difficult to remove the Fuse from.  Plastic pipe was never the exact outside diameter that I wanted. 

Currently using a solid steel rod @.75" diameter.  The only issue is that it's extremely heavy. But it's benefits are: when waxed it avoids glue very well.  I've made a jig to mount it on and the weight becomes a benefit - I can really manipulate the balsa to where I want it. 

I couldn't tell you where to get another steel rod as this one came out of a scrap pile from my uncle who's a professional welder and erects skyscrapers.
Logged
flydean1
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 30
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,319



Ignore
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2020, 01:22:58 PM »

Suggested source.  Check general purpose machine and fabrication shops for off cuts.
Logged
USch
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 36
Offline Offline

Italy Italy

Posts: 1,297




Ignore
« Reply #6 on: October 10, 2020, 01:41:41 PM »

Normally I use brass tubes which are perfectly round and straight. You can find them in nearly any diameter you need. You don't even have to check about blemishes on the outside, in many years I never found any nicks. And you can us them to laminate composite tubes on it!

Only problem may be to find a shop which sells short pieces. Fortunately I have one nearby  Grin

Urs
Logged

Fast up-Slow down
faif2d
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 32
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,288


Sun came up I was here to see it = good day



Ignore
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2020, 04:37:41 PM »

Years ago I made a tapered boom form by wrapping a long triangle shaped piece of brown paper on a steel (1/2"?) rod.  I then waxed the paper but there are better ways to cover the paper now.  You could change the taper by the size and shape of the triangle.  I used brown wrapping paper.
Logged

I used to like painting with dope but now I can't remember why!    Steve Fauble
TimWescott
Platinum Member
******

Kudos: 18
Offline Offline

United States United States

Posts: 1,225



Ignore
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2020, 11:44:28 AM »

Currently using a solid steel rod @.75" diameter.  The only issue is that it's extremely heavy.

I suggest thick wall aluminum tubing, in some strong-ish alloy (i.e, 6061, tempered is better).  Such tubing should be plenty strong and plenty straight, and not nearly as heavy as steel tube.

Available from Online Metals and other such places, or at your local scrapyard if you're lucky.

Note that if you're buying new, there's a difference between "tube" and "pipe".  "Tube" means stuff that's designed for structural use, with a controlled outer diameter and straightness.  OTOH, "pipe" means stuff that's designed to carry fluids (liquids or gasses), with a controlled inner diameter and smoothness.  If you get some copper pipe for plumbing and it happens to work -- lucky you!  If you get tube, you can expect it to be close to the advertised diameter, with some attention paid to it being straight.  (Usually "mill finish" tube is going to be close enough for woodwork -- "mill finish" means its what came out of the mill; they aim for "no smaller than advertised" so it'll be a bit oversized, but well within woodworking tolerances).
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
Print
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!