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Author Topic: Gordon Whitehead 24"Bristol Scout + PAW 0.55 diesel  (Read 688 times)
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mick66
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« Reply #25 on: October 17, 2020, 05:11:17 PM »

Hi

Probably just a case that on the relatively low rpm and small prop there was just enough left torque to give a nice left turn with the slight differential on (actually just one) of the port wings to balance it and keep the wings up.  I trim left left on sports FF ... always have ... learnt to fly in a very small field :0

I did deviate from plans to build a recessed firewall further back to accommodate the radial mount on the PAW .55cc.

Look forward to hearing the results.  These GWhitehead models do fly very well.

Mike

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fred
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« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2020, 10:39:59 PM »

Those Pix/ close ups of the diesel model are certainly evocative.
I gave up diesels a few years ago now My PAW's are back in their yellow boxes .
 The Non  availability of Fuel in my part of the world. (Revised Healthy 'n Safety rules on the ingredients).
The need to change clothes  before entering the house 'She' detests the smell of burnt kerosene and castrol.  Happy wife = Happy life  :-)
 AND that my models got So oil soaked that the wood softened after a summers use.
Despite virtually sheep dipping the engine and surrounding regions  in Epoxy.. purely to preclude that. Made Glo fuel seem benign TBH.

Old skool can be selective Memory.
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #27 on: October 18, 2020, 05:20:55 PM »

Fred, you're completely right, but I'm pressing on with this hair-brained project regardless!  Grin

Just banged in my order for the balsa required (a bit heftier than my usual indoor rubber scale stuff) and misc other items.

Despite the 20% increase in span, I'm not changing any of the material thicknesses, although I am beginning to think that a simple built-up tailplane and rudder would help keep the weight down at this larger size - the engine isn't going to get heavier and there's no point in finding out at the end that I need to add unnecessary nose-weight!
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #28 on: October 18, 2020, 06:34:59 PM »

And here's my scheme:  https://vimeo.com/172725324 but I'll leave off the Lewis gun and all!

Full story here:  https://bristolscout.wordpress.com/
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #29 on: October 19, 2020, 08:18:32 AM »

So a question about soldering piano wire, please:  what type of solder should I use, do I need flux, what sort of flexible wire to use to bind, and how to best prepare the piano wire?
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billdennis747
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« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2020, 08:43:23 AM »

So a question about soldering piano wire, please:  what type of solder should I use, do I need flux, what sort of flexible wire to use to bind, and how to best prepare the piano wire?
I look forward to the experts' answers to this. I used to be able to solder easily but not any more. It's as if the materials, ie the piano wire, have changed. I use cored solder and plumber's paste flux but the solder doesn't run well and I end up with a black mess. Yes I have a big iron.
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Kevin M
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« Reply #31 on: October 19, 2020, 09:39:43 AM »

Well I'm not an expert, and I have had the same problem as Bill in the past, the piano wire does seem different. I have had success recently using 60/40 tin/lead solder which contains 2 percent flux, but I use a soldering paste as well. The solder wire I'm using at the moment is Kaina brand, widely available on the internet. I'm not sure who the makers of the paste are, but I expect they are all pretty similar.

I prepare the piano wire by first de-greasing as much as possible with an organic solvent such as acetone. Then I lightly file until the metal is bright and very slightly roughened. Then I use little scraps of wet and dry, changing them regularly until the metal is very clean.

I try to keep the bit of the iron as clean as possible;  I tin it before, during and after use, and if there is any blackening of the bit, file down to bare copper and re-tin, or change the bit.

For binding the joints I use thin copper wire or fuse wire, 5A fuse wire should be plenty for the Scout.

I'm sure there will be people much more expert than me who have better suggestions.
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Re: Gordon Whitehead 24"Bristol Scout + PAW 0.55 diesel
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fred
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« Reply #32 on: October 19, 2020, 12:34:09 PM »

I polish the piano wire with a bit of 200 grit Wrap the joined bits with a neat winding layer of copper wire..
 a strand Salvaged from a piece of Stranded wire is Great..
 On a Small model  (smallish piano wires) i use simple Electronics type flux cored wire.
 Bigger wire 3mm etc  One needs use Straight solder and apply Flux.
 Tricky tho as most current solder is low lead .. harder to use that swill... practice first.
 Need to use a powerful enough Solder iron.  I use a Weller 'gun' for small piano wire.
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mick66
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« Reply #33 on: October 19, 2020, 01:58:58 PM »

Hi

This stuff was a bit of a revelation to me ... works very well.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0001P07M0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Bit pricey but will last a lifetime I guess.

100W solder iron helps too.

Mike
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #34 on: October 19, 2020, 02:10:14 PM »

Earlier I ordered exactly the same stuff Kevin has in his photo, plus a decent roll of 5A fuse wire.

I only know how to solder electrical connections (LiPo plugs etc) with multi-core solder which contains flux.  How does one use external flux?
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #35 on: October 19, 2020, 02:12:43 PM »

Another vote for Powerflow Flux. My pot dates back to the 1970s I think but I've used it for soldering model aircraft bits and other things like soldering nipples onto motorcycle bowden cable . It's good stuff but I think you need the clean it off or can start corrosion its that aggressive. I just use ordinary low temperature electric solder for small models, for bigger stuff J60 size I've used higher temperature plumbers solder.

I'm not that skilled at it but my wife trained as a silversmith and tells me cleanliness is everything when soldering - bright metal is a must, an aggressive flux helps too
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Kevin M
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« Reply #36 on: October 19, 2020, 02:56:52 PM »

Quote
How does one use external flux?

Just a small smear over the joint applied with the tip of a cocktail stick, very little needed. It will flow everywhere. That's my technique anyway.
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #37 on: October 19, 2020, 03:14:14 PM »

I bind the joint which has been emery or oxide papered to a bright shiny finish, in copper wire stripped from some multicore cable ( auto electrical wire is good 30amp)

Apply flux to that with a matchstick all over , heat with a big iron until the flux fizzes and burns off and then apply the solder , it should wick into the joint if not it's not hot enough.

Once its cooled I wipe off any excess flux

I've always admired Dave (Dputt7's) soldering on his models I wonder what he does ?
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DHnut
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« Reply #38 on: October 19, 2020, 03:48:46 PM »

Chris,
          I do the same as you do except I polish the copper wire as well and that seems to remove a coating. This was done after I had some poor joints and so far has fixed the issue.
Ricky
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dputt7
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« Reply #39 on: October 19, 2020, 09:27:38 PM »

  I just polish the joint with wet n dry and wrap with thin copper wire (stripped from multi core electrical wire)apply Bakers Soldering Flux, heat the joint with an 80 watt iron until it sizzles and then apply the solder from the other side and let it wick in.  Much the same as everyone else.  Looking forward to your build Jon  Cool
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Jack Plane
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« Reply #40 on: October 20, 2020, 03:12:14 AM »

 I just polish the joint with wet n dry and wrap with thin copper wire (stripped from multi core electrical wire)apply Bakers Soldering Flux, heat the joint with an 80 watt iron until it sizzles and then apply the solder from the other side and let it wick in.  Much the same as everyone else.  Looking forward to your build Jon  Cool

Thanks all for the gen on soldering... and no pressure then!!  Grin
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