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Author Topic: Attaching wheels  (Read 279 times)
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TimWescott
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« on: March 19, 2021, 08:03:04 PM »

How do you attach wheels to itty bitty rubber power planes so that they don't fall off and the mounting weighs a ton?  I want to graduate from the "bend the end of the wire over" method.

https://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=25522.0;attach=238285;image
Attaching wheels
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OZPAF
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2021, 08:52:32 PM »

I currently use a narrow strip of masking tape - about 5-6 turns on the axle. It's necessary to carefully ensure that the first turn is very tight. Snip of excess length and hit the end of the tape with a small drop of CA and it's secure.

Alternatively a small length of electrical insulation forced on or a small length of heat shrink - again hit with CA as well. One nifty idea with the insulation was to use a smaller diameter and let it soak in thinners to expand it - force it on and let it shrink tightly onto the wire.

I have also read of cotton thread being wound on the axle and hit with CA.

There you go Tim - just a few for starters!

John
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kaintuck
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« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2021, 08:53:19 PM »

Can be as simple as putting a dab of your favorite epoxy or canopy glue...build up slowly until satisfied. I have put a dab of solder on balsa wheel axle, using a protection over the wheel...
Marc
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NormF
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« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2021, 08:56:03 PM »

Tradition would be a drop of Ambroid on the axle. I also like OZPAF’s wire insulation method. I use that method for securing freewheel props. A good source for small wire insulation is 4 wire telephone cord.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2021, 09:36:46 PM by NormF » Logged
TimWescott
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« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2021, 10:14:50 PM »

Tradition would be a drop of Ambroid on the axle. I also like OZPAF’s wire insulation method. I use that method for securing freewheel props. A good source for small wire insulation is 4 wire telephone cord.

I'm an electronics engineer, with a lab that has stuff in it spanning back to before I was born.  So -- I think I can scare up some insulated wire!  Those wheels are drilled to be a fairly close fit on the wire, so it won't take much.
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stupid
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2021, 11:13:19 PM »

Here is a material that works good but not so good if you get caught By your daughter or wife.

Wire ear ring keepers. 1/8"long works well.

I think it works better than wire insulation because it's formalized for just this purpose as long as your axle sizes isn't too small.

                                                  Bob

                                 
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Don McLellan
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« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2021, 11:34:32 PM »

Hi Tim,

Not sure what it is called, but I use heat sensitive 'shrink wrap', used for covering (insulating) joined (soldered) wires.  I comes in all colours, including black, and in quite small diameters.  Simply cut a very short length, slip in onto the axle, and heat it with a heat gun.  The heat will shrink the 'wrap' onto the wire, preventing the wheel from coming off.

Cheers,
Don
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TheLurker
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« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2021, 04:51:37 AM »


I use the insulation idea as noted by OZPAF.  Here.
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USch
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« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2021, 08:07:17 AM »

As usual in my life I try to find the most complicated way. For that you have to produce a small brass washer with a hole of the same diameter as the wire. Then you need a steady hand, a good, small soldering iron and most important, a good, acid flux. To let the wheel have some backlash I place a piece of paper between the wheel and the washer, put a very small drop of flux on the connection wire-washer and hit the point with a hot soldering iron and a little amount of tin.

A very adventurous way of doing things, you either succeed  Cheesy, or you throw away everything  Angry

Urs
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TimWescott
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« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2021, 01:22:56 PM »

I'm not going to use heat -- the reason that wheel looks like it's formed styrofoam with little plywood disks for bearings is because it's formed styrofoam with little plywood disks for bearings.  Even a heat gun will make it shrivel up into a little untidy wad of goo -- heating the axle enough to solder would definitely invite disaster.

The washer + solder idea could easily be adapted into a wooden washer + glue; I may do that on bigger wheels.

(Note that on my control line planes I drill a hole into the end of a 1" or so piece of brass tube, then solder that onto the end of the landing gear.  Then the wheel can be kept on with a pin.  I mostly do it because it's nice looking, but on those rare occasions when I want to deep-clean a plane, I can just pop the pins and have the wheel into the sink in two shakes).
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Flyguy
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« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2021, 02:59:27 PM »

For light rubber jobs, I just use a thread, tie half of a square-not, pull it tight on the wire (can hang a clothespin or something for weight on one end to keep it tight), hit it with a drop of jelled CA, only takes a few seconds to set, then trim it off. Very light plus easy to remove if you ever have to replace the wheel, photo of wheel on my KK Ace.
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Pit
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« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2021, 04:27:11 PM »

Paper punch (they are available in various sizes), heavy paper, light card stock or even an old credit card and a dab of glue.
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« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2021, 05:58:22 PM »

In addition to the wheel retainers, if you get the good paper punches that the crafters use, they can be used to punch holes in up to 1/16" balsa for lightening holes.  Also a good way to put leadout holes in control line ribs.
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