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Author Topic: A question of time  (Read 776 times)
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GeoffinIN
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« on: October 07, 2021, 05:33:33 PM »

How long does it take you to build most of your FAC scale models?  It seems that some of you can pop out a work of art in a weekend, while I may take six months to build a butt-ugly junkheap.!  How about the rest of you?

Geoff the terrible builder
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dorme
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2021, 07:27:34 PM »

Some can build in a week or so, but the time consuming element is in the details of covering and marking.  I can build the fuse/wings easily in a week(faster if you use CA) under pressure but the covering/details will take me another week. Especially, if I do all of the covering/markings it in Draftsight.  It is the the small stuff that eats up the time.  It also depends on how you manage your time.  Do you work piece meal or can you put in some hours? 
I find that I frequently do research on the plane and spend time planning the rubber/motor/prop.  It isn't a rush for me as I enjoy all of it, but I do find certain details tedious and am always looking for a way to speed them up or come up with a consistent process for dealing with them. It is all part of the joy of building.  Perhaps looking into who flew that plane or the history of it and bearing that in mind during the construction.
If your attitude is speed then take up another hobby.  For me, I love the building. I even love the old kits where you have to cut out the pieces.  I'll spent an evening listening to a favorite radio program and cut out all the parts putting them into marked baggies and then start building the following night.  Very restful and fulfilling.
And then you have the thrill of flying something that you built!  Vs how many aliens you killed last night on your computer.
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TheLurker
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« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2021, 06:32:13 AM »

I think the attached universal progress chart may prove helpful.  Please note the asymptotic section at the end.  The point at which you are, "Almost Done",  Tad and the point at which you've had enough, "Oh B****r it! Done!" Tobitd are entirely dependent upon your reserves of patience and obsession with detail. Smiley
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kaintuck
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« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2021, 07:45:27 AM »

It's taking me almost a lifetime to slowdown...when younger....I wanted to build a plane on a Saturday to look just like the box cover picture.....I'd cut corners, say that's good enuff on joints...put the covering on in a fever pitch....and we all know how they looked and flew.
Then one day I understood it's a hobby....build a easy plain Jane to fly, but build them scale ships for the pleasure of engineering!
Some kits can be built with 20hrs...like the Lazy Bee kits....then there's the scratch build of a twin Hudson bomber that's into the months building time....and I don't know when I'll finish her..... Grin

Building planes is kinda like a date......if you slow down, you'll get a better outcome.... Wink
Marc
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rrfalcon
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2021, 01:02:21 PM »

As has been  noted in many places, one reaches a point where it's 90% done, with only 90% remaining to do.
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2021, 02:27:56 PM »

Quote
I think the attached universal progress chart may prove helpful.  Please note the asymptotic section at the end.  The point at which you are, "Almost Done",  Tad and the point at which you've had enough, "Oh B****r it! Done!" Tobitd are entirely dependent upon your reserves of patience and obsession with detail. Smiley

Brilliant Lurk. I find this graph applies to many other aspects of life too  Grin
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Russ Lister
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2021, 04:47:19 AM »

Great stuff, Lurker  Grin
Good to see that some of my builds are actually on schedule .... except the ones that have flatlined on procrastination  ....
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GeoffinIN
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« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2021, 07:44:44 AM »

Maybe you've identified my problem.  I'd procrastinate more but I keep putting it off. Roll Eyes
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lincoln
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« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2021, 09:37:58 AM »

I have the impression that stick and tissue jobs take me 30 or 40 hours for something simple. Subtract a few hours if you don't wander around trying to find a tool that you just put down or actually have in your hand. Add a few hours for fancy markings. I don't understand why people with real airplanes go to such trouble. If I was building a full scale plane, I'd start testing the moment it had the legally required numbers on it, though I suppose I might paint it white or something first. This color scheme is about my speed:
http://rvplane.com/showthumb.php?picname=DSCN3647.JPG
I don't actually count the hours or build very often, so take all this with a grain of salt.
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Russ Lister
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« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2021, 09:51:43 AM »

Maybe you've identified my problem.  I'd procrastinate more but I keep putting it off. Roll Eyes

 Smiley

Even 'this time around' in the hobby, I could build a Bostonian inside a week .... it just seems to have left me.

I remember working on the rigging of my Pensuti Pistachio in the early hours of the morning before indoor Nats in 2006 .... I won't let myself do it these days, when perhaps I should?

I fully covered my Charlie Newman Firecrest while listening to the Pink Floyd set live at one of the Live Aid concerts .... that was the night before dreaming spires. I wish I could do this kind of thing to a better schedule!
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DauntlessSBD
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« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2021, 08:35:08 PM »

Me? I have a photograph of my P40E Warhawk that was all bones, and was taken in 2007, and it's not finished yet.  Since that time, I've covered it but it is still not finished - Canopy and prop are still needed.  I also have a P-38, and an Me-109 that are under construction, although they are more recent - last year or two.  In between, I have built several models in the last 3 years to completion, including a Guillow's Arrow, a Sterling Schweitzer Glider, and a couple of Prairie Birds and Comet Cloud Busters.  Also during that time, we sold our house, lived in a motorhome for 9 months while our new house was being built, and moved in and started making a lawn and garden.  After that, I bought a portable shed that was 16' x 36', complete with 2 man-doors, one double door, and 5 windows, with a 6' porch, had it finished inside, so now I have a true "Hobby Shop".

Justin
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cvasecuk
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« Reply #11 on: October 10, 2021, 05:19:31 AM »

Back in December 2000 I wrote an article for our club newsletter. It started with a reproduction of something Andrew Longhurst had put in a SAM35Speaks where he describes making a Dizzie Lizzie in ten days in bis lunch hours! Here is part of how my article continued…..
And now for what is my normal building programme.
Day  1.      Select wood for stripping for fus. Reject most and decide I need to get some more. As it is Thursday I will go to the model shop at              the weekend as that will be quicker than sending for some.
Day 3.      Go to model shop but their stock is very low and have nothing suitable.
Day 5.       Order some suitable wood from Pauline.
Day 8.       Strip wood for fus. Build a side.
Day 9.       Build second side.
Day 10.        Join fus sides together   .
Day 11.        Admire what I have done so far
               etc.      etc.      etc.      etc.      
Day 35.        Finish model.   
Day 38 to 53.     Wait for good weather to go trimming.
Day 54.         Get fed up with waiting. Model breaks as wind is too strong for first flights.
Day 55.         Decide that the old model will be OK for one more season.

Ron
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vintagemike
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« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2021, 01:08:47 PM »

Bloody hell Ron thats quick!!!! I remember when I could turn a model out in about a week! Takes me that long to pin the plan to the board now! ha ha ha ha
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cvasecuk
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« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2021, 02:02:46 PM »

Don't forget, tyhat was 20 years ago. Now that I am retired and have lots of spare time it takes me at least twice as long to build a model as it did then!!!
Ron
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Russ Lister
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« Reply #14 on: October 10, 2021, 03:44:02 PM »

Ha ha .... but time seems to pass more quickly as we get older, so are we really just using the same amount of existence as we always have? Would Einstein agree?
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packardpursuit
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« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2021, 02:43:23 PM »

Took me a life time, finally realizing that the destination is not always the reason for the trip.
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GeoffinIN
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« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2021, 05:51:52 PM »

Ha ha .... but time seems to pass more quickly as we get older, so are we really just using the same amount of existence as we always have? Would Einstein agree?
Doesn't that depend on which direction you're facing?  Or is that feng shuei, not Einstein? Huh
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DavidJP
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« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2021, 05:49:39 PM »

Some profound comments here.  I think really it is a question of stamina.  A number of people do seem to apply themselves fairly continuously to a build and so it is done more quickly than I ever complete anything.  Because I rarely work fairly continuously on a model - and neither do I have more than at the most two on the go at any one time.  Often there will be a gap of certainly a few days and often a week or so here and there before I return to it and continue.

I am retired but as Ron points out take longer now to complete a model than I did before.  And then my models - being larger and R/C were more involved!

It is a hobby and that is how I prefer to build my models - as and when I feel like it.  That is not to say I watch TV - that I can take or leave and usually the latter.  Neither do I play games on the computer.  I have none. But I do not get bored. 

So I have been interested to read the comments here - all valid and practical and illustrate how diverse we all are, thankfully.

It doesn’t matter though- I just remember years ago I joined a model engineer club to learn some skills .  Some members were building model steam locomotives.  Some models had passed through two or three hands due to the demise of the person who originally started it and could well have passed through a few more before being finished. 

So if it provides enjoyment and fulfilment why worry?
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