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Author Topic: Making graphics tutorial?  (Read 292 times)
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GeoffinIN
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« on: October 13, 2021, 07:50:01 PM »

It's bad enough that I'm a lousy builder, but I'm a worse graphics installer!  Part of it is that I've never understood computers, so computer generated stuff is over my head, but even cutting letters out and applying them sans wrinkles is beyond me!  Can anyone point me at something that can help?  I've got a 23 7/8" span Bellanca Viking nearing completion, and I'd really like to make it look good if possible!

Geoff the inept
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awilder
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2021, 12:54:48 PM »

 I've made simple graphics using "Canva".  It's online and free.  I download the finished designs as a .jpg and then import them into a Word Document.  Once I have the designs arranged correctly, I print them onto the tissue.  There are probably better ways, but this works and is free.

I attached a couple of examples.
 
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« Last Edit: October 14, 2021, 02:41:54 PM by awilder » Logged
GeoffinIN
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2021, 08:43:07 PM »

OK, thanks, but how do I get to the finished designs?  I REALLY am a computer idiot!  Right now I'm trying (and failing) to shrink a photo of a Bellanca Viking instrument panel so I can print it and put it in the model.  I can't install the windshield until that's done. Sad  I found the image on Microsoft Edge, but use Google Chrome normally.  They don't seem compatible.  What am I supposed to do?  I can't find a good photo on Google!

Geoff the idiot
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RolandD6
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2021, 11:04:20 PM »

Hi Geoff

There are more efficient ways of reducing the size of a photo if you have other graphics software installed on your computer. What I am about to show you assumes your computer is running Microsoft Windows and you know where to find the Paint program, normally an icon for it is on the task bar at the bottom of your screen.

1. Find a suitable photo on the internet and save it on your computer. Your last post suggests you already have one. The one being used in this example comes from:

    https://160knots.com/N4201B.htm

2. Open the photo in Paint, 1st image below;

3. Click on the Resize button, 2nd and 3rd images below);

   You may want to crop part of the photo using the crop tool beforehand;

5. Enter the required size of the photo as a percentage of the original size and click the OK button; 4th image below;

6. The photo will be reduced to the specified size, 5th image below;

7. Save the reduced photo on your computer, 6th image below.

Continued in the next post.


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« Last Edit: October 14, 2021, 11:17:06 PM by RolandD6 » Logged
RolandD6
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2021, 11:13:46 PM »

Continuing from the previous post.

8. Find the saved reduced size image on your computer, 1st  image below;

9. Right click on the name of the photo or the thumbnail image of it to view it properties; 2nd image below;

10. Select 'Details' from the list of properties. This information will tell you what size the image will normally print at.

In this example the width is given as 200 pixels at 230 dpi which means it will normally print to width of 0.87"

There are other ways as well. Most printers will allow you to scale the photo by a percentage. You will need to determine how to do that from your printer's documentation.

Hope that helps

Paul
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TheLurker
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2021, 02:21:05 AM »

If you need to create images and text from scratch then an alternative to Canva (Canvas?)  mentioned above is Inkscape (www.inkscape.org) , like Canva it's free but it's installed on your PC.  It's rather like Paint.

To shrink a photograph using Inkscape.

Open it with Inkscape, I usually use the right click "Open With" option from File Explorer and accept the import defaults.
When it displays click somewhere on the image, then click the padlock between the height & width measurement and set the desired height or width. The other measurement will be set automatically because the padlock locks the aspect ratio.  If you want to keep it then save it, you will have to save it as svg - Inkscape's file type, otherwise just print it and you're done.




Where Inkscape is really helpful, even if you're not a great artist (you & me both) is for creating registrations & other serials.  You have access to all the typefaces (fonts) on your machine so can create serials at any size up to the limit of your printer's page size.  If the characters used for the serial or legend are non standard, you can import a photo of what you need and using the Bezier tool (not difficult, but another time ) to trace them and, this is where Inkscape and other vector drawing packages come into their own, scale down or up to suit your model without getting jagged edges.

You can also use it to create other images like roundels, squadron badges & manufacturer labels if you've got the time & patience. Again you don't have to be a great artist as you can often find a source image to trace.

It's also available for Linux, which is what this lapdog is running, and Mac users .

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GeoffinIN
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2021, 09:35:19 AM »

Fantastic!  Paul, you even selected the photo I was trying to use!  Many thanks you guys!!!
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GeoffinIN
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2021, 05:40:15 PM »

It worked!  My computer has a 3-D version of paint, and the instruction icons are different, but I DID get an instrument panel done.  I ended up printing a screen shot which left streaks across the paper (Raster lines???) but they don't show at the panel's small scale.

Again, many thanks to you three for your help!

Geoff the slightly less inept
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RolandD6
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« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2021, 06:07:00 PM »

Excellent.

Now you are on your way to doing all sorts of things graphical. Experiment. You cannot break the computer but it can become confused if you try do do things too quickly. Let each operation finish before initiating the next one. Patience is a virtue when working with very large graphics files. If something does not work as you had hoped, try a different approach. You can always ask for help again.

Do simple things first. The danger is trying to get too sophisticated before you really understand the fundamentals.

Paul
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