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Author Topic: Zoomer by Al Casano  (Read 404 times)
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stupid
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« on: November 17, 2021, 02:41:20 AM »

Zoomer by Al Casano

Al  "Unique design and adjustments enable this snappy contest glider to make astounding flights."

  Just about says it all, Al Casano's Zoomer was published in Air Trails November, 1940.

   Which qualifies it to be flown in Society of Antique Modelers (SAM) competition. One of the earliest hand launched gliders to have poly dihedral, and it has quite a bit. Hence the tall fin, which looks unusual compared to modern designs.  SAM rules states that you have to follow the same outlines of the original glider not using any modern synthetic materials to strengthen the model, but you can vary the thicknesses of the materials, in this case Balsa wood.

   The plan, published in Air Trails had a differences between the written measurements  and the drawing that states that it is (full size). There is a 1 inch difference in the length of the tail moment. You wouldn't notice this unless you had a copy of the full size plan. The tail moment in the drawing is 1 inch shorter than the 6 1/2 inch measurement.

  While flying the Zoomer in our club starting in 2000, there was some discussion about which variation was legal. that turned into an argument  I tried to avoid. There were four of us flying The Zoomer in competition and one of the club members contacted Al Casano's son, who was still alive, asking if there was any of Al's pre-published drawings  of the Zoomer, where we could verify which variation was the original model. He actually received a response but there weren't any of his hobby materials left after his death regarding the Zoomer. I would like to think that the drawing was altered so that it would fit on the page in Air Trails.  Conclusion is you can build it with the longer or shorter tail moment, your choice.

  I would  like to thank Dave, aka, Ratz for taking my copy of the Zoomer plan, which was a copy of a multiple generations and was looking kind of ratty. He cleaned up the 4 parts of the drawing,  and stitched it together.  It looks quite amazing compared to what I sent him. The Zoomer plan is in the plan gallery (plans from magazines and books,  Air Trails magazine).

https://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_plans/details.php?image_id=12155

  You might ask, why build a hand launched glider that was published 60 years ago, other than a trip down memory lane. I find it interesting that most all the gliders that have been designed,  there doesn't seem to be one that flies noticeably better than any of the others. Once you have built a few, you get a handle on the wood densities and trimming methods that work for the particular design. It's a challenge to take a design and see how well I can make it fly. They all seem to thermal well enough if you get them into one.
  An easy glider to throw, even for the kids.
                                       Bob
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Zoomer by Al Casano
Zoomer by Al Casano
Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2021, 06:36:40 AM »

Starting off, selecting the wing balsa wood. For a hand launched glider with a high aspect ratio wing, the wing should be a little stiffer to keep from flexing on the launch.  6 1/2 (lb/ft³) should be stiff  and have sufficient mass for enough inertia  on the launch to reach a reasonable height. I'm going to have a little thicker High Point than on the zoomer plan, because that's how I initially made this glider and it worked well.

   I'm pre tapering the wing blank from the High Point to the trailing edge on the bandsaw. This is the first time I've tapered a wing blank for a 3 inch cord. So I laid out some lines on the balsa wood blank with sharpie marker and adjusted the angle on the bandsaw until I could see that the cut was at the 1 inch Mark for a 33% High Point  airfoil.

  The pre-tapered blank looks good, but I failed to remove the sticker from the balsa wood and the wing blank does look thinner were the sticker was. It won't matter because the wing tip will be tapered. Anyway.
                               Bob
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2021, 02:48:00 PM »



  " SAM rules states that you have to follow the same outlines of the original glider not using any modern synthetic materials to strengthen the model, but you can vary the thicknesses of the materials, in this case Balsa wood."

 Guys, I can not find anything in the SAM rule book that says you can not use any modern synthetic materials to strengthen the model. Please enlighten me.
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« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2021, 08:17:57 PM »


 Guys, I can not find anything in the SAM rule book that says you can not use any modern synthetic materials to strengthen the model. Please enlighten me.
You are right. There is nothing in the Sam rule book says that you cannot use any modern synthetic materials to strengthen the model.  I only made his statement because I was led to believe that it was a rule.      Doing a build of the Zoomer was a trip down memory lane for me, & just because I wanted to fly it again. The Denver chapter of SAM. #1 was disbanded years ago, and I don't plan on traveling anywhere to fly it in a contest.

  If you are really interested in finding out if synthetic materials are legal on SAM hand launch gliders, there is a email address down the bottom of the rulebook where you can find someone who can answer your question about synthetic materials.
     
   The goal of the Society of Antique Modelers was to be faithful to the design and the construction materials. They suggest before you start building a design that you have a copy of the original plan and article  to document that you were faithful to the model. The rules give some allowances in the use of modern materials for a dethermalizer system & body materials.

   Rules are rather vague in stating that models shall be in character of the original model.   When I was flying in a SAM. #1 contests, it was generally understood that carbon fiber is not allowed in hand launched gliders. And I suppose it's up to the discretion of the contest director, but only in the material of the body.

Maybe someone will comment who is more familiar with current interpretation of SAM rules.

  Section I – General Definitions and Competition Regulations
Applicable to Free Flight and Radio Control
  D. The construction of Old Timer models shall be in the character of the
original model.
  8. Hand Launched Gliders designed prior to 1951 are allowed. They
may be modified only in the following ways: adding finger grips,
adding dethermalizers if outlines remain unchanged, and changing the
body material and/or thickness if both the height and length remain
unchanged.

http://www.antiquemodeler.org/sam_new/rulebooks/Rulebook-Booklet-January%202020%20FINAL.pdf

   

   
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2021, 03:54:51 AM »

Accomplished a little more on the Zoomer. I used a airfoil sanding block for the leading edge and then glued on a 1/32 by 1/16 inch piece of Basswood around the leading edge with cyanoacrylate glue.

  Flatten the wing tips with a straight taper to the poly dihedral joint. To get the wing tips symmetrical. I set the wing on a piece of glass 1 1/4 inches from the edge. Using the glass as a guide with the sanding bar.

   Then shape the wing tips into an airfoil, kind of sort of. Final, unfinished weight 10.4 g

  One coat of sanding sealer and one coat of top lacquer brought the final wing weight to 11 g 6/10 of a gram of finish.

  I decided to reinforce the leading edges of the stabilizer and fin with 1/64" x 1/16" Basswood, and then taper them to the tips as shown on the plan.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2021, 08:18:37 PM »

It occurred to me that Paul Lagans Papanui Tavern glider. Is very similar to the zoomer wing.
I reread his article to see if he mentioned what weight fuselage wood he used. He doesn't. Although his glider is a 17 inch wingspan at 21 g
https://outerzone.co.uk/plan_details.asp?ID=12318
  After sketching out the outline of the fuselage on some straight grained 10.5 (lb/ft³) balsa wood, I decided to set the fuselage incidence up 0-0, being that the wing is 3/16 inch thick.
   
 The best way to do this would be to size the fuselage between glass with a sanding block. The radius in front and behind the wing were sanded in with sandpaper wrapped on dowels.
   The final taper behind the wing to the leading edge of the stabilizer was set up on the edge of a glass tabletop overhanging the bench, then sanded with a sanding block. I know this looks anal but it makes building more Zoomer fuselages exactly the same, easier. The measurements of the outline the fuselage is slightly over the specified measurements by 0.03 inch.
  I also taper the fuselage from behind the wing to the tail in thickness to 1/8 of an inch.
  I cut a slot into the nose at an angle to reinforce the front of the fuselage for 1/16 inch thick plywood to retain its shape when landing on asphalt. The glass is 3/32 of an inch thick, so cutting fuselage nose from each side gives a 1/16 inch thick slot.

Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2021, 09:52:38 PM »

   The balsa rays in the airfoil looks like a salmon fillet.

 I made a new dihedral glue up jig for the Zoomer. The jig makes for real accurate gluing.

  Tumbling Pidgeon dethermalizer made with 1/64 inch thick birch plywood, aluminum reinforcement wraps around the center of the trailing edge of the wing to protect it from the dethermalizer line.

  The alignment jig for the gluing the wing to the fuselage are so easy to make its well worth while to get this joint accurately aligned. The more accurate you can assemble your glider the less trimming you need to do on the field.

  Getting everything straight & square to glue on the stabilizer.

 The tumbling Pidgeon pop-up wing joint was only partially cut through using the Master Airscrew balsa stripper before gluing on the 1/64 inch birch plywood cheeks . After the wing was mounted and the glue dry , just a few wiggles and it separated easily.

Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2021, 10:17:05 PM »

All assembled 20.3 g. The center of gravity is supposed to be 65%, so I', m not too far off

  Quite a bit of dihedral, 3 1/2 inches under each wing tip.

  Tumbling Pidgeon DT, it still looks odd to me.

Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2021, 10:43:32 PM »

We had some calm weather this evening to spray on the Design Master Floral Spray.
.85 of a gram of color brings the weight to 21.15 g and balanced at 65% an additional .95 g
for a final weight of 22.1 g

  51.67 in.² in the wing makes the wing loading   .42 g/in.²

 Tumbling Pidgeon dethermalizer on a hand launched glider creates a problem with the finger rest mounted on the wing. That much pressure on  1/64 inch birch plywood cheeks might break the wing off the fuselage. I'm thinking of creating a slot in the fuselage for a 1/16 inch birch plywood finger launching rest, similar to what Glen Simpers did with his "Spirit of America hand launched glider"
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2021, 06:56:19 AM »

The finger rest made with 1/16 inch plywood turned out better than I expected. The lower position on the fuselage is more comfortable. Three small Dremel diamond discs equals 1/16 of an inch exactly.

  Sketched out the finger rest on the plywood, cut it out and glued in to the slot on the fuselage with cyanoacrylate.

   The wire rings that hold the rubber band for the pop up wing were made from .020 music wire and are slightly 
open sideways so you can release the rubber band but keeps the rubber band from coming out on its own.

   Aluminum pie pan for the shield of the burning fuses is easier to form than pop can material and it's flat. Angling out the 7/32 aluminum snuffer tube makes it easier to insert the fuse.

  A cheap torch cigarette lighter makes it a lot easier to light the fuse even in windy weather, and they light every time.

  The Zoomer with the DT weighs 23 g for a wing loading of .44 g/in.².    The dethermalizer system added  approximately 1.5 g. Most of the additional weight was at the nose and  for balance anyway.
Attached files Thumbnail(s):
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2021, 10:01:19 AM »

Bob:
Nicely done ... as always.

Think you'll fly her soon?

Best-
Dave
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« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2021, 03:05:57 AM »

Thanks Dave,

  It looks like my next window of opportunity will be this coming weekend, weatherwise.

   It's been a while since I've thrown a hand launched glider,  I'll have to practice the running throw steps to get back into stride, so I don't fall flat on my face.
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« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2021, 01:31:03 PM »

The javelin launch footwork in the previous sketch didn't look quite right. Watching a YouTube video makes it  more fluid and easier to understand than looking at four sketches.

   Follow through with the finger snap on the gliders finger rest.

How to throw the javelin with Thomas Röhler.
In step 4, Thomas explains, keeping the elbow up to prevent injuries.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ro_65dDQHI&ab_channel=WandaDiamondLeague
Thomas Rohler 93.90m Video Analysis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXggGWGVdv8&ab_channel=ThrowsCoach
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« Reply #13 on: December 01, 2021, 04:13:57 AM »

 Al Casano states, "this glider was the result of many experiments"

After doing preliminary trimming with the  Zoomer, I've discovered that my glider is extremely nose heavy with a fuse DT mounted on aluminum pie plate material.   
   The 4 1/2 inch length of nose was probably that long, so no additional nose weight would be required. I reduced the amount of snuffer tube and change the pie plate material to heavy aluminum foil to protect the nose from the smoldering fuse.

  The 0-0 bench setting  isn't enough incidence. I've increased the bench setting to about 1/32 of an inch in 4 inches . I will have to wait for the next decent weather day to do more trimming.
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Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
Re: Zoomer by Al Casano
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« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2021, 01:00:14 PM »


Interesting to note.

What's the forecast looking like?   Smiley

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