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Author Topic: All American Vintage Wakefield  (Read 213 times)
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calgoddard
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« on: November 23, 2021, 12:12:23 PM »

I am thinking about building an All American Wakefield.  The design for this model was published in a 1952 edition of the Air Trails Model Annual. It therefore qualifies as an Era 1 Wakefield under the rules for the Vintage Wakefield provisional event.

I purchased an excellent Flite Tech kit for this model from one of my mentors.  See the attached picture of the label on the kit box. The Jim O’Reilly drawn CAD plan that came with the kit has a 9/18/03 date on one corner. An earlier plan for the All American can be found on Outerzone here: https://outerzone.co.uk/plan_details.asp?ID=314

The design of the All American is simple and construction should be relatively quick and easy. It looks like an over-grown Jabberwock. Even though it has landing gear, I wouldn’t have to launch my All American via ROG per the rules of the provisional event.

The Era 1 Wakefield models cannot have variable incidence surfaces (except for the pivoting stab of the DT). This will make my All American more difficult to trim than if the model had auto-rudder and VIT. The Era 2 and Era 3 Wakefields have significant handicaps in terms of the minimum weight of the air frame and the maximum weight of the rubber motor so the Era 1 Wakefields should be competitive.

Except for variable pitch and delayed start, the rules of the Vintage Wakefield provisional event allow for any type of front end to be used, regardless of the era of the model. The Flite Tech kit for the All American came with a nearly complete nose block assembly.  The prop folding mechanism is conventional, i.e., like that used in many OTR models. It has a compression spring that pulls a dog on the rear end of the motor hook into engagement with a screw stop in the nose block when the tension of the rubber motor falls to a predetermined level. In his sale of the kit, my mentor also included a Simplex “Simpltorque” torque operated F1B front end. Is there any significant advantage to using this front end over the rudimentary front end that operates in response to rubber motor tension?
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All American Vintage Wakefield
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DerekMc
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« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2021, 03:40:51 PM »

I built and flew that kit for several years. I used the included front end. It flew quite well till I crashed it.  I made the wheels removable and flew it in Mulvihill at our local contests.  The Simpletorque prop wires are beefier which makes a difference in a crash! 

I have a few pictures:

Launch!

https://i.imgur.com/9eZ8B8E.jpg
All American Vintage Wakefield
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Derek
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« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2021, 03:43:35 PM »

The removable wheels:

https://i.imgur.com/paOeZTJ.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/NDd6CX8.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/iIg39Go.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/syyGiAH.jpg

All American Vintage Wakefield
All American Vintage Wakefield
All American Vintage Wakefield
All American Vintage Wakefield
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Derek
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« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2021, 03:55:31 PM »

If memory serves I flew it with lot's of power (80-90 in/oz)  It was a rocket and had a decent glide.  It crashed after it took a tumble on the ground after DT and I didn't notice that the incidence had changed due to a stab adjustment key falling off.  I launched it at full power and it hit the ground shortly thereafter with a close to full wound motor.  BOOM!!!!

Have fun building and flying it.  Excellent kit produced by the Al Brush/ Burdov team. 
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Derek
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« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2021, 06:33:41 PM »

You could might fly the All American in SAM large cabin. The SAM rules require the original style prop hub.

The SimpleTorque, reverse Montreal hub was designed for fixed weight, stretched motors as in 40/30g F1b, 10g coupe or 20g Andrade(TeenyTorque). It also allowed the prop to fold under the wing. None of these features are needed on an old timer and could even cause other problems.

NormF
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calgoddard
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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2021, 02:35:35 PM »

Derek and Norm -

Thanks for your comments.

Derek - I was thinking of making the landing gear removable and I like your solution Derek.  Thanks for the pictures.

Norm - I will use the original front end included in the kit. I want to be able to use rubber motors of various sizes. The instructions included with the Simpltorque front end are very lengthy and complex.

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