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Author Topic: Can I thin Titebond II Premium Wood Glue with water?  (Read 470 times)
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PantherM100
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« on: May 16, 2022, 09:26:35 PM »

Hi Guys:
Can I thin Titebond II Premium Wood Glue with water,
If so how much 50/50, 25 water/75 Glue?  Or what?
For framing a balsa P-30
Thanks in advance
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Indoorflyer
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2022, 10:16:44 PM »

Try gluing some sample/test joints to see for yourself?
« Last Edit: May 16, 2022, 11:16:32 PM by Indoorflyer » Logged
ironmike
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« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2022, 10:54:35 AM »

Yep, do it all the time. I do it at 50/50 for laminations.
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TimWescott
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« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2022, 01:45:13 AM »

Yep, do it all the time. I do it at 50/50 for laminations.

OK, I'm chipping that into a cement wall somewhere in my brain, for the next time a control line builder says "never use water-based glue for laminating".
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Pit
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« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2022, 03:27:45 PM »

Be sure to use filtered/distilled water or you'll soon have gremlins growing in the bottle!
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fred
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« Reply #5 on: June 08, 2022, 03:27:25 PM »

Yep, do it all the time. I do it at 50/50 for laminations.

OK, I'm chipping that into a cement wall somewhere in my brain, for the next time a control line builder says "never use water-based glue for laminating".

Out of Context perhaps.  Laminating likely refers to Sheeting / Skins. 
Where water based glues DO mess up thin balsa sheetings.
 Introducing a bewildering /hair pulling   array of of warpings.
 Typ Edge laminations don't usually warp... due to the  clampings required to make the things..
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VictorY
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« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2022, 05:45:43 PM »

Yep, do it all the time. I do it at 50/50 for laminations.

OK, I'm chipping that into a cement wall somewhere in my brain, for the next time a control line builder says "never use water-based glue for laminating".

Out of Context perhaps.  Laminating likely refers to Sheeting / Skins. 
Where water based glues DO mess up thin balsa sheetings.
 Introducing a bewildering /hair pulling   array of of warpings.
 Typ Edge laminations don't usually warp... due to the  clampings required to make the things..



That's weird. I've never built a sheeted leading edge without using water based glue and actual water on the convex side of the curve to get the sheeting to conform to the rib shapes. If it's thicker sheeting, I use a very wet sponge to get enough penetration. Thinner sheeting is sufficiently softened with a damp rag. 1/32 doesn't really need any moisture to bend unless you are trying to make really small radius curves like small tubes.
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fred
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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2022, 12:42:53 PM »

You've either been V lucky, or the pieces involved are small, or you haven't noticed... Pick one.:-)
Suggest trying :   paint on white glue to anywhere you wish sheetings to stick to. In your case:  lE,  ribs, spars etc.
Pieces, which unlike skins are less likely to be altered by moisture.
When the Glue has dried (ideally overnight) Use a covering iron and Iron on the skins .
 It works perfectly.
Fine Furniture makers have used this technique for veneering ....for Many Decades.
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VictorY
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« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2022, 02:33:14 PM »

Don't think I'm lucky or not seeing the warps. Titebond is water based and used by an enormous number of model builders. Water is also an extremely valuable tool in the workshop. I have used, and will continue to use it until someone can show me a better way to sheet leading edges. I have also used the iron on method but you better get it right the first time.
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Squirrelnet
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« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2022, 02:51:49 PM »

I use water based glue (Aliphatic) for just about everything in a balsa structure including laminating edges often using water or more usually steam to soften the wood so it conforms, obviously it needs to be weighted down/pinned/held in position while it dries

I think Titebond is a form of Aliphatic so I agree with Ironmike, works a treat
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TimWescott
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« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2022, 04:28:51 PM »

That's weird. I've never built a sheeted leading edge without using water based glue and actual water on the convex side of the curve to get the sheeting to conform to the rib shapes. If it's thicker sheeting, I use a very wet sponge to get enough penetration. Thinner sheeting is sufficiently softened with a damp rag. 1/32 doesn't really need any moisture to bend unless you are trying to make really small radius curves like small tubes.

The one time I tried that I ended up with the Starved Horse Effect because the wood shrunk a bit as it dried, leaving the ribs showing through a bit.
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TimWescott
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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2022, 04:31:27 PM »

Yep, do it all the time. I do it at 50/50 for laminations.

OK, I'm chipping that into a cement wall somewhere in my brain, for the next time a control line builder says "never use water-based glue for laminating".

Out of Context perhaps.  Laminating likely refers to Sheeting / Skins.  
Where water based glues DO mess up thin balsa sheetings.
 Introducing a bewildering /hair pulling   array of of warpings.
 Typ Edge laminations don't usually warp... due to the  clampings required to make the things..

Flat surface (i.e. glass).

Layer of paper towels (seems to conduct water away).

Balsa, plywood, whatever.

Water-based glue.

More balsa.

More paper towels.

Another flat surface.

Lots of junk from the welding shop.

Works great -- you need to give it a few days to dry, because it's laterally out the paper towels, but it does dry, and it's nice and flat at the end.

Here's a hollow-core profile Ercoupe fuselage getting built.  3/16" thick (I think) framework; a mix of solid in the nose and truss in the back.  3/32" outsides.  Sigbond or Titebond II glue.  I let it dry for a few days.  It didn't come out as flat as a board -- those are all more curved than the table top.  It came out as flat as the table top, and has stayed that way.
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