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Author Topic: Canopy Glue  (Read 1526 times)
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Sundance12
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MAAC #25680, VE4BDF (amateur radio callsign)

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« on: March 29, 2008, 11:32:10 AM »

I was wondering what people use to glue on clear canopys? I am about to do this procedure with my P47D Thunderbolt but am holding off pending a new answer. I don't want to use CyA.

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JohnDowland
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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2008, 12:44:29 PM »

I was wondering what people use to glue on clear canopys? I don't want to use CyA.

Particularly don't use CyA. The gassing-off as it sets will craze most plastics. There's a product that claims to not do this, but why add more things on your shelf for one-off usage? Especially things with short shelf lives.

The hobby standard for this is Pacer 560 Canopy Cement, Google that. It'll run you about four bucks. Or run by the craft store and look for any PVA (which is Pacer 560 too) glue--may cost less, may be right on your block & no waiting--and run a test. If it doesn't drip when it's wet, if it dries clear, you may have just what you need. PVAs are also great for flexible joints like LG, wing struts, almost any major component assemblies--so this isn't a one-use product, it's incredibly handy.

My standard flash-card lecture on canopies:
Get it stress-free first, most important thing. Trim, cut, sand and fit perfectly before even thinking about gluing. The way to smudge a canopy is when you try to get it to lay down & it doesn't want to. Fit it to lie in place with no stresses.

Then apply the smallest drops of PVA that you dare--either just enough to tack down, or enough tacks that you can go back when it's set and secure and you touch more in where you can.

If possible, set the canopy down dry first and lay on a small bit of lo-tack masking tape as a hinge at the front, or other convenient fold place, and fold back, then apply the glue dots. This helps you register the position the canopy will lay down in, and give you one less thing to think about and fumble with at that critical moment.

If you do smudge, try getting it off with alcohol on a Q-tip. This works when dry too, to some extent. Also, full-strength Future will help clear up a smudge somewhat--and you will apply Future over your completed canopy, framing and all, as a protectant and a clear-maker. Do it inside and out, before gluing the canopy down. Touch up the outside if needed.

Don't be afraid to goof. Anything that goes wrong can be torn up and done over.

Michael
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2008, 12:48:17 PM »

Thanks Michael, I found that very helpful as well.

What does PVA stand for? I need to get that into German somhow.

Tobias
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Sundance12
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2008, 01:56:01 PM »

Hi Michael:

Thanks for the informative post, I will do exactly as you suggest in installing my canopy. I have a few fitting issues to work out first as the rear top of the canopy is not as radius-ed as the razorback is and this makes a poor fitting of the canopy there. It is workable but it keeps the canopy from sitting installed with no further stress points. I'm close with it and your information will help me succeed.

Thanks again for making this an educational post.

Cheers
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Art356A
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2008, 02:07:23 PM »

The Brits make a product called "Superphatic!" which ought to be available on the Continent. Sells here for about $10 for 50ml., probably less there.

Art.
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2008, 02:25:21 PM »

I use door and window clear silicon II. Just apply with a toothpick ( you don't need much). Sticks to all surfaces, and will not fog or deform. In my opinion, its way better than any glue and I've never had an issue using it.

sky
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2008, 02:40:27 PM »

Now why haven't I thought of using silicone before!!!! Should work well if you can control the amount adequately.

Doug
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Dan G.
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2008, 11:07:05 PM »

Michael ... thanks for that very comprehensive posting on glues and canopies, earlier today. That doesn't sound like hard stuff to get -- that PVA. I presume that stands for poly-vinyl acetate. I don't know where I've heard the term (probably modelling mags) but it rolls off my tongue with no prompting at all. I'm not used to the notion of flexible glues and that sounds interesting enough to try.

Dan G.
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skyraider
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2008, 07:58:36 AM »

Below is a pic of my Dauntless canopy siliconed to the fuselage. But every builder has their own way of doing things. This for me, works better than anything I've ever tried.
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JohnDowland
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« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2008, 11:18:47 AM »

I have a few fitting issues to work out first as the rear top of the canopy is not as radius-ed as the razorback is and this makes a poor fitting of the canopy there. It is workable but it keeps the canopy from sitting installed with no further stress points.


Okay, now, break my own rule (and whose kit is this? Tell the guy and see if he'll rework.) --that rear joint is not going to get better, so that will be the first point you actually glue down.

Do it like this: Fit what you can of the canopy, always pressing the bad radius to the fuselage with thumb & finger to make it lie where it must. Try rolling the curve of the canopy to make it smaller, but CAUTION: rolling too hard and too tight may craze the plastic, so be gentle; and also, do this right before gluing, because the canopy may have a "memory" and may want to creep back to its original shape.

When all's fit, put your tiny tape at center top of the canopy/start of the razorback, and get ready to glue but don't yet. First, decide how you'll hold the stressed canopy where the problem will happen. How about a couple of the smallest pins, predrilled in the canopy corners, and sticking into the rear deck former? Or more lo-tack tape.

Now, with your canopy tape-hinged in the rear and pulled back, apply your glue only to the rear top center and the front edge, that flat part that is the armor-glass windscreen. Put the canopy down and secure, and let set.

Now it's not going anywhere, and you won't fumble and smudge. Pry up and apply glue droplets progressing out from what's secure now, and insert a couple small balsa sticks stuck between canopy and fuselage on each side to hold things clear until you're all ready. Grasp the bad curve again like before and smoosh down into the curve, remove the rear standoff sticks and let the plastic snap against the framework, & pin or tape. Then pull the fore set of sticks out, & you should be pretty flat.

Lotta describing, but it's a procedure that works better if you prethink and plan. This should work.

Michael
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JohnDowland
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« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2008, 11:42:52 AM »

Here's a simple bit of jigging that will help you in putting on a canopy, and in any operation involving your model NOT flopping about as you work. See it here, then move it where&as you like if the thread gets too cluttered.

After several evenings of trying to do the fine markings on this model while cradling it in my lap and shooing Firecat out of same, I dug some stuff out of my kit and made up a Mandrel. First pic shows the skinny end, a plastic rod with a hole big enough for the motor peg to go through; it threads up inside the model and secures through the m'post holes.

The motor post is one of the two strongest-engineered points on a rubber model; the other's the faceplate for the noseplug. This mandrel passes through there, and so I'm holding the model securely where I will do no damage. Beats a lap.

The newspaper mask over the fin, well--we had a Passover seder here that week, and I sorta prudently hid the Nasty symbol. Just in case.

Picture #2's the fat end of things. A machine-shop castoff collet chuck holds the mandrel, & it's tightened down just enough to move if I manhandle it, sorta friction-fit. You could kloodge up any kind of C-clamp or twistee-tie fixture on this end.

Picture #3 shows the whole assembly. Frees up both hands, and if Firecat doesn't get too nosy, he can have "his" lap back.

Michael
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« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2008, 02:26:04 PM »

Plain old Elmer's White Glue works well (let it dry overnight) and it has the advantage of melting off with soaking when it comes time to recover and you want to remove the canopy.
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« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2008, 08:19:05 PM »

"PVA" is simply a term used for Poly Vinyl Acetate..Type 560 "Canopy Glue" looks white (in the bottle) like Elmers glue, but has a better "tack" for holding canopies in place, and dries clear.

I have not found anything better for the task...

Guru
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robert mathison
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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2008, 11:52:37 AM »

I like to use FORMULA 560 canopy glue, it is slow drying but very strong .

Bob
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« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2014, 05:30:15 PM »

I use Sure Grip by Zinsser/Rustoleum... its a wallpaper seam and repair adhesive...dries clear and grips in about 10 sec.
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« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2014, 08:10:33 AM »

Aleena's Crystal Clear "Tacky Glue"
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« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2014, 08:50:06 AM »

Michael, I had a good laugh at the hidden swastika explanation!  As for your model supporting mandrel, great idea!  I've done something similar when working on big models, but used my bicycle repair stand in place of a cast-off collet, which not all of us have access to.  One could also, if a lathe owner, use the reversed or removed tailstock to hold the mandrel.

Skyraider, when using silicone on canopies, how do you get a small enough bit of it where you want it?  All the silicone products I've tried are too viscous.

Geoff
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