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Author Topic: Diesel Power  (Read 959 times)
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craig h
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« on: November 19, 2010, 11:22:59 AM »

If I wish to get into diesel power... let's say in the 1/2A or A size model... what size engine would be needed and what would a first model of choice be. I am looking into an old timer or nostalgia era model( something for both AMA and SAM events). Are diesels to much trouble to even consider to get into for this type of power free flight. Does it require a great deal of field equipment and where do you get the fuel?

Thank You.... Craig h
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faif2d
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2010, 11:28:07 AM »

This site will have engines as well as fuel.

http://www.carlsonengineimports.net/index.shtml
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glidermaster
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« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2010, 05:34:44 PM »

Diesels have a reputation for being oily and smelly. To each his own as regards smell, but they do spit out a more oily exhaust than a glow. They tend to run slower than glows, so are generally a bit quieter.

If you can hand start an engine, then all you need is a model and a can of fuel to go flying, no glow battery to lug around.

Steer clear (IMO) of small diesels until you have experience. A good size is 1.5 to 2.5 cc.

A Dixielander and a PAW 249 is a good start. Some 50's FAI models are worth looking at too, and some of the repro. engines seem quite good (CS Oliver Tiger, for example).

John
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applehoney
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« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2010, 07:00:00 PM »

My first thought was Dixielander, too - but there are no SAM events for it

It's good for Nostalgia but - you do need to find a nostalgia-era diesel in the .15 to .21 range AM25 and AM35 come to mind ... repro Oliver also of course... etc.

Field equipment? Squeezebottle of fuel, d/t fuse lighter and you're ready to fly.
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OZPAF
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« Reply #4 on: November 19, 2010, 08:24:52 PM »

My first thought was Dixielander, too - but there are no SAM events for it

It's good for Nostalgia but - you do need to find a nostalgia-era diesel in the .15 to .21 range AM25 and AM35 come to mind ... repro Oliver also of course... etc.

Field equipment? Squeezebottle of fuel, d/t fuse lighter and you're ready to fly.

Have a look at the R250 by SMS Australia. This is a Oliver Tigre replica- powerful and well built by a practicing controline/free flight competition flyer with a precision CNC shop. This engine is one of the best in Vintage A team race world wide and is also used in Dixelanders. They also carry 1cc and 3.5cc engines. Well worth the money.

http://smrpl.com.au/

As regards running slower than glows - this engine will produce around 0.7hp and run at 17,200 on a 7x6 prop( this was the test run of my motor when I picked it up) .

Cheers
John
« Last Edit: November 19, 2010, 08:38:06 PM by OZPAF » Logged
gossie
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« Reply #5 on: November 19, 2010, 10:13:47 PM »

I've been a diesel freak since the 50s. But I do like glo's too.

Not too sure of the rules where you are but as said a diesel needs only the fuel and maybe a spare prop. and spanner out on the field. As long as it's in good condition and your fuel is fresh they start and run well.

The Rothwell Oliver Tiger is a SENSATIONAL engine, but there is a waiting list and it's 3 or 400 hundred dollars...... but if you want to be a winner, go for it. CS Olivers can be okay too. I have had one as well as a real Oliver Tiger I bought new, and I'm happy to use the CS version so as not to wreck the original. It starts easy, and runs hard. It did have a sloppy rod in it, but I got lucky and was offered a new unused one, fitted it and it's 100%. Perhaps a new or used PAW might suit, or an older diesel on eBay etc?

A Stomper from 1952 with a 1.5 in it always goes well....... I had 2 of them. Eliminator the WC winner in '52 for 1.5s is not a bad thing either...... also have had 2. Still have one with a Webra Rekord 1.5 that goes really hard..... bit tricky to start unless you use the correct fuel though.
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craig h
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« Reply #6 on: November 20, 2010, 03:55:58 PM »

Thanks guys... I know nothing about diesels but it sounds like it would be fun to fly.... you mean you just put fuel in it and prop it.... then she fires and away you go!!!! Huh That does sound like fun to me ! Now what engine of choice for the least bucks.... until I find if I really want to get into it with the big guys..and what bird to build for what class...

Thanks again men.... Craig h
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applehoney
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« Reply #7 on: November 20, 2010, 04:39:40 PM »

Craig, not quite that easy! You have to get to know how to develop that 'diesel flick' ... they have more compression than the usual glow engine. Also an extra control - the compression screw, the degree of use you have to learn by experience as you adjust both that and the needle for best performance.

Don't use an electric starter on one either
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danberry
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« Reply #8 on: November 20, 2010, 09:04:33 PM »

Craig, you need to be in contact with Doctor Diesel. That'd be Eric Clutton, in Tullahoma. He advertises in Flying Models.

You can consider him the Keeper of All Knowledge.
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ironmike
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« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2010, 11:51:52 PM »

Actually diesels are more fun running in the garage than on a model. Never thought Id get my models clean after powering em with the ole mills .75s
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Bill Adair
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« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2011, 02:58:59 AM »

Hi Craig,

My first successful model engine, was a McCoy .049 diesel that was a delight to handle. Had a Cub .049 glow first, but it wouldn't pull my Firebaby c/l airplane off the grass field we wanted to use. Swapped in the McCoy, and never looked back.

I love diesel engines, and now have a dozen, but can't resist buying them when bargains present themselves. Grin

Today, if you are inclined to build a free flight model, I'd recommend the PAW 55 from Eric Clutton, or Ed Carlson. Eric test runs all his engines, and leaves the needle valve and compression screw pre-adjusted, so your first starts should be very easy. Eric also sells a great book on running diesel engines, and that will save you a lot of trouble up front. In fact, I suggest you get Eric's book first and read it before deciding to get into diesel power. The book covers most of the do's and don'ts of diesel engines, and is well worth the price.

Both vendors have fuel, and it's a lot easier to buy it, than to find all the ingredients to blend your own (as we did in the early days). Diesels use much less fuel than glows, so a quart of diesel fuel will last a very long time for sport flying.

Almost any half-A free flight kit will fly nicely with the PAW 55.

There are other engines of course, but PAW is one of the few lines of diesel engines still in production, and parts are available.

Best of luck with your quest.

Bill
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Sandgroper
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« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2011, 07:13:07 AM »

My latest Slow Open Power model is a 13 oz John West version Dixielander with a dieselised OS10LA for power.I made the head up from a RJL .049 diesel head machined to a button(with bush to increase the o.d.to suit the 10) and made a clamp ring to suit.It uses two standard headshims but now I have the clearances figured out I can make a head for one shim.I ran the engine in with a Taipan 7x4 black and it pulled 14,600RPM on 5% nitro.After conversion it pulls 14,700 on the Taipan and 14,900 on a APC 7x4 using fuel with 20- 25% castor oil.OS FP and LA engines make good diesels,the FP has a longer stronger conrod but the LA is smaller and weighs less at 109g with a little lightening.I have a 10FP and will do a comparison later.In SLOP diesels get a two second longer engine run so in this case the diesel may kick butt.
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perttime
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« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2011, 07:36:02 AM »

From what I have understood, a glow engine tends to have good peak power at high RPM but a diesel gives a "flatter curve", with more power available at lower revs.

Glow fuel seems to be easier to get.
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